Tanglewood Java TWJP Review

If you’ve never played a parlor guitar like the Tanglewood Java TWJP, you’ll likely be struck by how small, narrow, and super-light it feels. You might also be surprised to learn that in the 1880s, a guitar of its proportions actually would have been considered large.

By the early mid-20th century, guitar was becoming more common in live ensembles, making big, loud guitars like the dreadnought a necessity and, in time, the most popular acoustic guitar design ever. But as sound-reinforcement technology makes an acoustically loud guitar less important on stage, the tone potential of the parlor guitar has been re-examined.

There are plenty of stunning parlor options at the high end of the market by Bedell, Bourgeois, Collings, Martin, Santa Cruz, and others. Now those guitars are inspiring offerings at the opposite end of the price spectrum. The Java TWJP is a fine example of this trend. It’s designed in England and made in Indonesia, and references both 19th-century instruments and modern boutique flourishes. If you’re looking for a small, affordable acoustic that generates unique acoustic tones and textures, this cool, compact instrument might be just the ticket.

The low-end warmth is nice counterpoint to the guitar’s punchy midrange focus, which lends itself well to old-time fingerpicking styles like country blues and ragtime.

Wooden Tangents
One of the first things sharp-eyed tonewood connoisseurs will notice about the Java TWJP is the unusual selection of woods used for its back and sides. The back is built from three pieces, like a Martin D-35. But instead of a traditional tonewood, like rosewood or mahogany, the centerpiece is mango—a pale-colored wood with spalted figuring. The two outer pieces, also dramatically figured, are amara, which looks more like rosewood. Amara makes up the guitar’s sides as well.

The top is built from solid cedar, which is a fairly conventional tonewood, but one that’s more common on nylon-string guitars and boutique steel strings. And then there are the tasteful wooden flourishes that lend an organic classiness to the instrument. Instead of the usual plastic binding, Tanglewood uses mahogany binding on its body and fretboard. There’s also a mango heel cap, and the slotted headstock lends a touch of old-world elegance.

The build quality of inexpensive guitars seems to be continuously improving these days, and the Java TWJP shows how nicely built an affordable offering can be. Though the fretwork isn’t perfect—there’s a little roughness at the edges—it’s certainly neat enough. The kerfing and X-bracing appear tidily glued, and the polyurethane finish is smoothly buffed, without any obvious visual defects.

Ratings

Pros:
Solid cedar top. Nice quality for the price. Punchy output. Cool tones.

Cons:
Bass response could be better; not necessarily appropriate for heavy-handed strummers.

Tones:

Playability/Ease of Use:

Build/Design:

Value:

Street: 
$379

Tanglewood Guitars Java TWJP
tanglewoodguitars.co.uk

Modern Moves
The Java TWJP is a pleasure to play, with a neck that should appeal to a wide range of players and hand sizes. The C-shaped, nato neck is of moderate girth. At 43 mm (about 1.69″), the nut width is narrower than the fashionable-for-fingerstylists 1.75″. But it definitely feels spacious and is a good fit for players transitioning from the electric guitar to the acoustic. The guitar has a plastic nut and compensated saddle, instead of the traditional and more expensive bone, but the intonation is perfectly precise. The open-geared tuners, meanwhile, manage a vintage appearance while delivering smooth, accurate, modern performance.

Moves to the Middle
Like most folks, I’m accustomed to playing a larger-bodied guitar with a more traditional tonewood mix (in my case, an Orchestra Model with an Adirondack spruce top and rosewood back and sides), so at first I was a little underwhelmed by the projection of the Java. But it certainly didn’t take long for me to appreciate its abundant charms.

The Java’s diminutive size isn’t the only factor in its unique tone makeup. Neck and body meet at the 12th-fret rather than the 14th. Most players and luthiers assert that this configuration improves bass resonance by moving the bridge closer to a sweet spot near the center of the top. And indeed the Java’s voice has a hint of warmth and sweetness that you could probably link to the 12-fret design as well as the cedar top. The low-end warmth is nice counterpoint to the guitar’s punchy midrange focus, which lends itself well to old-time fingerpicking styles like country blues and ragtime. And while the midrange is certainly the more powerful voice of the two, there is enough balance to create nice separation between notes. When I let a chord ring out, especially one that included a combination of fretted notes and open strings, I was impressed with the sustain and detail.

The Verdict
There are some inherent drawbacks that come with a guitar the size of the the Java TWJP—at least if you’re accustomed to the power of a dreadnought or orchestra model. Heavy strumming with a pick can induce a midrange-y wash (though it’s easy to imagine this sound making a cool rhythm track for more boisterous roots rock, country blues, or even gypsy jazz). And for many players, the lack of bass output will sound foreign and feel odd. But whether you’re new to the acoustic guitar or seeking more uncommon acoustic tones, Tanglewood’s Java TWJP has a lot to recommend itself. It pairs an old-school voice with modern reliability and build quality, and it’s a whole lot of fun to play. If you can work the lack of low-end punch into your sound, this little guitar can open up a world of unique and distinctive acoustic colors.

[“Source-premierguitar”]

Faculty development class on Java begins

Image result for Faculty development class on Java begins

A five-day faculty development programme on Java fundamentals and Java programming got under way at the Kakatiya Institute of Technology & Science (KITS-W) here on Monday.

It is being organised in association with Telangana Academy for Skill and Knowledge (TASK), Hyderabad and Oracle Academy, Bangalore. The programme was inaugurated by KU College of Engineering and Technology Principal K. Gopal Kishan Rao.

Addressing the participants, he urged teachers to keep themselves abreast of latest developments in their respective subjects. They should be able to answer the queries of students with confidence, he opined.

Guest of honour and Oracle Academy technical expert from Bangalore Senbaga Sundaram said that Java was foundation programming language to build all kinds of software applications. Oracle uses mostly Java programming language for its development.

The latest computer applications such as Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition (OBIEE), Oracle Application Development Framework (OADF), Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) and Artificial Intelligence (AI) are mainly based on Java. KITS Director Y. Manohar said that computer and mobiles were very important things of daily life.

The related softwares of computers and mobiles were designed and developed by using Java programming with the help of fundamentals. The programme was a technical platform to learn and share the latest technologies, he added.

[“Source-thehindu”]

How to convert Java apps to JavaScript with CheerpJ

CheerpJ
© Shutterstock / Prarinya

Sometimes, you need to convert your Java programming into JavaScript. In this article, Kayla Matthews explains how you can save time with the CheerjP tool to convert Java into JavaScript, just like that!

Many feel that JavaScript is superior to Java. For starters, it’s not aging like Java. But also, it’s much easier to understand and work with especially for weekend warriors. Of course, the two function very differently.

Java can stand on its own, while JavaScript must be placed inside an HTML document – sometimes referred to as a container.

JavaScript, HTML, and CSS are specifically designed for web applications and web development. Java, on the other hand, can be embedded into a full-blown proprietary application. It does not require anything else to function. These days, everything is making the jump to the web or some form of web applet for use on existing platforms, like mobile, for instance.

The differences make it difficult to convert aging Java apps and code to JavaScript. Often, it can be a long, drawn-out process requiring more than one programmer to complete the scope of the work.

CheerpJ—a new compiler technology—is about to change all that.

CheerpJ

Cheerpj is a unique tool that will convert Java bytecodes into JavaScript, allowing developers to move their applications and software to the web with relative ease.

The best part is it doesn’t require a plugin or Java installation to work. For good measure, this means you don’t have to go through the trouble of downloading, installing, and configuring a Java environment and IDE.

It even has an offline compiler, to move Java to JavaScript with little to no effort. Server-side Java components can convert into client-side libraries for use in a browser. That’s a huge deal and will allow developers to take their standalone product, or app, to the web. Effectively, it could mean opening up your aging application or tool to more users, on more platforms and devices.

SEE MORE:  Java is alive and well, thank you, and is just as relevant as ever

Due to the nature of JavaScript, finished applets will be less rigid, easier to understand when reading the raw code and much more colorful in terms of interaction and events. JavaScript is often associated with web page events and actions regarding website development. Conventional Java isn’t exactly conducive to this sort of thing.

Plus, with JavaScript, you can be much more specific in your object and action calls. For instance, you can reference existing items like the status bar or browser window and make updates or changes directly to that component. You can’t do this with Java.

JavaScript is also compatabile with many leading technologies. For example, Widevine’s Encrypted Media Extentsions (also known as EME) relies on JavaScript to manage digital rights licenses across multiple devices and servers.

While tools like CheerpJ already exist – namely the Google Web Toolkit, which also allows you to put your Java content in a browser – Learning Technologies  says CheerpJ is remarkably different from other platforms, like Google’s.

What sets CheerpJ apart is that other platforms don’t offer full support for Java constructions and deployment. They only contain a partial implementation and reference to the Java runtime library.

So, developers will have a much easier time converting new and young applications to browsers, but existing apps with established code will be more difficult. Obviously, that’s not the case with this new compiler which means it opens up so many doors for the developers and founders of existing and long-standing Java applications.

SEE MORE: No swan song for Java: 11 influencers weigh in on its reputation, rivals and adoption

Of course, you could argue Java developers will need to familiarize themselves with JavaScript first if they aren’t already using it. While the languages and usage scenarios are similar, there are some differences that will make active development difficult if you don’t know what sets them apart.

Luckily, the jump from Java to JavaScript is a fairly easy and quick one to make as far as language shifts are concerned.

General availability

A limited release went live in July, but not everyone can get their hands on it just yet. A public release won’t be ready until later in November, which will be the official commercial version. If you’re not already a part of the limited access team, you’ll have to wait until after the public launch.

Still, it’s been a long time coming so a few months longer to wait is nothing, especially for Java developers that have been around since the early days.

It’s worth noting that an additional release will be available as a Chrome browser extension. The web applet will allow Java apps to be run without plugins or full environment installations.

Top 9 improvements and features in Java 9

Java 9

Java 9 is almost here, and with its approaching release date, interest in the new features it will bring is at an all-time high. The current release date for the new Java version is 21 September 2017. That means we don’t even have two months to go! In order to prepare for using these new features, it’s a good idea to take a look and get a feel for how Java 9 really works.

There’s a lot of changes with Java 9. Below, I will list the top 9 improvements that have made it into the new Java 9. Let’s dive right in!

1. New module system

There are several problems with writing large applications or maintaining a library. With the increase of the code base, the chance to create complicated code with tangled dependencies increases. It is hard to truly encapsulate code as every public
class becomes part of your public API and there is no clear notion of explicit dependencies between different parts of the system.

The Jigsaw project that is included in the new Java version is meant to solve all these issues. The modules will consist of usual classes and new module declaration file. This module descriptor explicitly defines what dependencies our module requires and what modules are exposed for outside usage. All packages that are not mentioned in the exports clause
will be encapsulated in the module by default.

A simple module declaration that exports some of its package and requires others can look like this:

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module eu.dreamix.java9.modules.accessories {
   requires eu.dreamix.java9.modules.powersupply;
   exports eu.dreamix.java9.modules.accessories.headphones;
}

If you want more examples on how you can build application modules or to get familiar with the Jigsaw syntax and project you can visit the quick start guide here.

SEE MORE: Java 9 modules – JPMS basics

2. HTTP/2.0 support

The main difference between HTTP/1.1 and HTTP/2 is how the data is framed and transported between client and server. HTTP/1.1 relies on a request/response cycle. HTTP/2 allows the server to “push” data: it can send back more data than the client requested. This allows it to prioritize and send the data crucial for loading the web page first. Java 9 will have full support for HTTP 2.0 and feature a new HTTP client for Java that will replace HttpURLConnection which only works in blocking mode – one thread per request/response pair. This increases the latency and loading times
of web pages. The HTTP client also provides APIs to deal with HTTP features like streams and server push.

Two example HTTP interactions are shown below, they are taken from the Java 9 documentation:

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HttpClient client = HttpClient.newHttpClient();
// GET
HttpResponse<String> response = client.send(
    HttpRequest
        .newBuilder(new URI("http://www.foo.com/")
        .headers("Foo", "foovalue", "Bar", "barvalue")
        .GET()
        .build(),
    BodyHandler.asString()
);
int statusCode = response.statusCode();
String body = response.body();
// POST
HttpResponse<Path> response = client.send(
    HttpRequest
        .newBuilder(new URI("http://www.foo.com/"))
        .headers("Foo", "foovalue", "Bar", "barvalue")
        .POST(BodyProcessor.fromString("Hello world"))
        .build(),
    BodyHandler.asFile(Paths.get("/path"))
);
int statusCode = response.statusCode();
Path body = response.body(); // should be "/path"

3. Improved Javadoc

From my experience working for Dreamix, a Java development company, sometimes the pleasure is in the small things. Currently, if you want to find some class documentation you have to search in google. In Java 9 there are several improvements to the Javadoc and one of them is the addition of a search box.
In Java 8:

Java 9
In Java 9:

Java 9

4. Stream improvements

The Stream API was one of the game changing feature in Java 8 and with Java 9 it has gotten even better. Now you will be able to create Stream from Optional. There are also four new methods added to the Stream interface: iterate, dropWhile, takeWhile, ofNullable.

DropWhile discards the first items of the stream until a condition is met.

TakeWhile processes items until a condition is met.

SEE MORE: Java 9 misconceptions & Java 10 wish list: A tell-it-all interview with Java influencers

Iterate allows you to write proper replacements for the for loops using streams. It takes the initial value of the stream, the condition that defines when to stop iterating and the step function to produce the next element.

OfNullable as the name suggest let you create streams from objects without the need to check for nulls. It returns a sequential Stream containing a single element, if non-null, otherwise returns an empty Stream.

5. Easier initialization of collections with new factory methods

Currently if you want to create a List of predefined values you have to do a lot of typing:

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List<String> euCountries = new ArrayList<>();
euCountries.add("France");
euCountries.add("Bulgaria");
euCountries.add("Germany");

In the future, the initialization of common collections will be a lot easier with the newly added factory methods. The static methods in the interfaces make it possible and the List, Set, and Map interfaces are enhanced to have the method for collection creation with up to 10 elements. The resulting objects are immutable collections that are optimized for performance.

Adding items to these collections after creation results in an `UnsupportedOperationException`.
The above code will change to the nice looking:

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List.of("France", "Bulgaria", "Germany");

These are some of the added methods:

Java 9

6. Private methods in interfaces

Java 8 gave us the default methods in interfaces. These methods have body and give behavior to the interfaces, not only empty signatures. What would you do if you have two public methods that do almost the same thing? Most probably you will try to move the common code in a private method and call it from the public ones. But what would you do in a similar situation where you have two default methods in interface instead of two public methods in a class?

In Java 9, you can use the exact same approach and have a private method with the common logic and this method will not be part of your API.

SEE MORE: Java 9 and the future of modularity: Will Project Jigsaw be a hit or flop?

7. Language and syntax improvements

Now it will be easier to write the try with resources statement. Previously all the resources that that have to be closed after the execution had to be initialized in the try clause as in this example:

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try(Resource res = new Resource("res")){
        //Code using res object
}

From Java 9 we can use final and effectively final resources in the try clause just like that:

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Resource res1 = new Resource("res1");
final Resource res2 = new Resource("res2");
try(res1;res2){
        //Code using resource objects
}

From Java 9 variable name cannot be consist of a single underscore (“_”). It will be possible to write underscores in your variable names as in my_var, but alone underscore will result in error. The reason behind this that the underscore will be reserved for future use in the language.

We will be able to use diamond operator in conjunction with anonymous inner
classes:

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BarClass<Integer> bar = new BarClass<>(1) { // anonymous inner class
};

8. Enhanced process API

So far, the ability to manage and control operating system processes was limited. Furthermore, the code that you wrote to do such interactions was dependent on the OS.

The new release will extend the ability to interact with the operating system. New methods will be added to handle PID management, process names and states, child process management and lot more.

An example code that retrieves current process PID and works on all operating systems will look like this:

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System.out.println("Current PID is " + Process.getCurrentPid());

SEE MORE: Java 9 fails and how to fix them

9. Java REPL = Jshell

Last but not least Java9 will include Read Evaluate Print Loop (REPL) tool from the project Kulla( http://openjdk.java.net/projects/kulla/ ). This command line tool is called jshell and if you want to write a few lines of code on their own to test something this will be the perfect tool.

You will not need new class with main method just to execute simple command.

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jdk-9\bin>jshell.exe
| Welcome to JShell -- Version 9
| For an introduction type: /help intro
jshell>2 + 2
| Expression value is: 4

What we will not see in the new release?

There are several good features that got dropped from the upcoming release. However, we will be waiting for them in Java 10.

A standardized and light-weighted JSON API is hyped by many java developers. However, it didn’t make the cut due to funding issues. Mark Reinhold, chief architect of the Java platform, said on the JDK 9 mailing list: “This JEP would be a useful addition to the platform but, in the grand scheme of things, it’s not as important as the other features that Oracle is funding, or considering funding, for JDK 9. We may reconsider this JEP for JDK 10 or a later release. ”

More bad news is that the money and currency API also lacked Oracle’s support and didn’t make it for the release.

Source:-jaxenter.

East of Java has fair trade goods and items

It was a big adjustment when Amber Kennedy made the move from Haida Gwaii to Port McNeill.

“My kids went from a school of 28 people to a class of 28,” said Kennedy.

The family moved to Port McNeill when Kennedy’s husband found work on the North Island.

“But its still a nice small town feel here,” she added.

Kennedy has since put down roots in the community, owning East of Java at 584 Broughton Blvd in Port McNeill for going on six years.

East of Java is a quirky gift shop with a long history in Port McNeill, as it was previously owned by Colleen Kostyshyn for around twenty years.

“I knew that I wanted to be self employed and I just fell in love with the store,” said Kennedy.

“I was talking to Colleen one day and found out she wanted to retire and it just went from there.”

Kennedy said the biggest change she made singing owning the store was moving to a new location.

She added about 1000 square feet when she moved from the previous location by the drugstore to her current storefront in Pioneer Mall, allowing her to store more items. “It’s a better location for exposure,” said Kennedy.

“I love everything in the store, I have to love it to bring it in – quality is the most important thing to me.”

She added one of her biggest priorities is that anything she imports has been fairly traded and ethically produced.

East of Java stocks a wide variety of unique gifts, baby items, clothes, oils, local art and so much more.

“We have functional items for the family and not just giftware, so its easy to find what you’re looking for,” said Kennedy.

“We have a heavy tourist season here but I rely on local customers too because the store is open all year round.”

Kennedy hopes people who have never been in the store before, stop by to check it out.

“You don’t know what’s here until you come and have a look,” she laughed.

[“Source-northislandgazette”]

Trio of Starbucks Rejects Delivers Java Fix to New Haven

IMG_1186.jpg

There is something wonderfully freeing about working in a food truck. The job seems to appeal to a certain free spirit, that individual who can’t quite fit into an office or even a kitchen in a restaurant. In a food truck, you are the king of your own domain. No bosses, no suit, just a view of whatever corner of the world you choose through a small window as waves of people come by to sample your wares. You listen to whatever music you choose, and approach the job whichever way you want.

The three New Haven 20-somethings who own and operate the Jitter Bus coffee truck in the Elm City — Dan Barletta, Paul Crosby and Andrew Mesiouris — are not huge fans of bosses. Having met as teenagers in West Haven, all three have been fired from Starbucks at one time or another. “You’re not cut out for this job,” Barletta says they told him when they let him go.

Well, joke’s on them. Now Barletta makes a living with his friends, working for themselves and each other, selling coffee on their own terms. Crosby, who has SINK and SWIM tattooed on the knuckles on his respective hands and was fired from a Starbucks in West Haven, says this has been the idea for him from the start. “It’s been my plan since I was in like fifth or sixth grade. It was a tattoo shop when I was young, but as I fell out of that, I grew into this,” he says.

Aesthetically, the Jitter Bus looks like what the Addams Family would come up with if they quit television and became do-it-yourself punks and tattoo artists. The old school bus is painted black with white designs hand-painted on. The Jitter Bus’ goth color scheme stands out amid the proliferation of brightly painted food trucks that populate our cities. Its one-year anniversary party was held back in March at Keys on Kites Tattoo & Gallery in New Haven’s Westville section, where they had a music show and raffled off a free tattoo.

The do-it-yourself attitude is not a hollow one. The guys in the Jitter Bus have built most of the mobile cafe’s components. Water tanks, counter tops, shelves, bus mechanics, even the swivel tray that holds the iPad cash register: all were built and designed by the three owner-operators.

On a blisteringly hot June day at their usual spot at the corner of Hillhouse Avenue and Grove Street, the boys on the bus are serving up hundreds of coffees ($2-$2.50), cappuccinos ($3.25-$3.75), cortados ($3.25), mochas ($4.25-$5), espressos ($2), chai ($3.50-$4) and the iced versions of all of them ($3-$5). Extra espresso shots can be added for 75 cents, and flavor shots of vanilla, hazelnut, caramel and coconut for 50 cents.

They get all their coffee from Connecticut, mostly from the Canton micro-operation Giv Coffee, and its excellent espresso blend Star Breather, sourced from Peru and Brazil with notes of dark chocolate, raisin and almond. Newington’s Saccuzzo Coffee Co. also provides beans, while pastries come from New Haven’s Whole G bakery and milk and cream from Connecticut-sourced Farmer’s Cow.

Despite the heat, there is a steady stream of people coming up for their usual fix. “We’re pretty much legal drug dealers,” says Crosby. “We sell it on the corner and everything,” Barletta adds after a laugh. The hundreds or even thousands of hole-punched loyalty cards oozing from every crack in the truck testify to the popularity of the truck and the regularity with which its patrons return. (While Hillhouse and Grove is their usual corner, the Jitter Bus is available for booking for events and festivals.)

A digital stroll through the Jitter Bus’ social media (follow The Jitter Bus on Facebook and on Instagram @jitterbuscoffee) reveals engine troubles, brutal weather, and the occasional celebrated appearance of Nari, a friend’s dog. The labor needed to make repairs on the bus, both Dan and Paul say, is the worst part about working for themselves. But still, they wouldn’t have it any other way.

[“Source-connecticutmag”]

Trio of Starbucks Rejects Delivers Java Fix to New Haven

IMG_1186.jpg

There is something wonderfully freeing about working in a food truck. The job seems to appeal to a certain free spirit, that individual who can’t quite fit into an office or even a kitchen in a restaurant. In a food truck, you are the king of your own domain. No bosses, no suit, just a view of whatever corner of the world you choose through a small window as waves of people come by to sample your wares. You listen to whatever music you choose, and approach the job whichever way you want.

The three New Haven 20-somethings who own and operate the Jitter Bus coffee truck in the Elm City — Dan Barletta, Paul Crosby and Andrew Mesiouris — are not huge fans of bosses. Having met as teenagers in West Haven, all three have been fired from Starbucks at one time or another. “You’re not cut out for this job,” Barletta says they told him when they let him go.

Well, joke’s on them. Now Barletta makes a living with his friends, working for themselves and each other, selling coffee on their own terms. Crosby, who has SINK and SWIM tattooed on the knuckles on his respective hands and was fired from a Starbucks in West Haven, says this has been the idea for him from the start. “It’s been my plan since I was in like fifth or sixth grade. It was a tattoo shop when I was young, but as I fell out of that, I grew into this,” he says.

Aesthetically, the Jitter Bus looks like what the Addams Family would come up with if they quit television and became do-it-yourself punks and tattoo artists. The old school bus is painted black with white designs hand-painted on. The Jitter Bus’ goth color scheme stands out amid the proliferation of brightly painted food trucks that populate our cities. Its one-year anniversary party was held back in March at Keys on Kites Tattoo & Gallery in New Haven’s Westville section, where they had a music show and raffled off a free tattoo.

 The do-it-yourself attitude is not a hollow one. The guys in the Jitter Bus have built most of the mobile cafe’s components. Water tanks, counter tops, shelves, bus mechanics, even the swivel tray that holds the iPad cash register: all were built and designed by the three owner-operators.

On a blisteringly hot June day at their usual spot at the corner of Hillhouse Avenue and Grove Street, the boys on the bus are serving up hundreds of coffees ($2-$2.50), cappuccinos ($3.25-$3.75), cortados ($3.25), mochas ($4.25-$5), espressos ($2), chai ($3.50-$4) and the iced versions of all of them ($3-$5). Extra espresso shots can be added for 75 cents, and flavor shots of vanilla, hazelnut, caramel and coconut for 50 cents.

They get all their coffee from Connecticut, mostly from the Canton micro-operation Giv Coffee, and its excellent espresso blend Star Breather, sourced from Peru and Brazil with notes of dark chocolate, raisin and almond. Newington’s Saccuzzo Coffee Co. also provides beans, while pastries come from New Haven’s Whole G bakery and milk and cream from Connecticut-sourced Farmer’s Cow.

Despite the heat, there is a steady stream of people coming up for their usual fix. “We’re pretty much legal drug dealers,” says Crosby. “We sell it on the corner and everything,” Barletta adds after a laugh. The hundreds or even thousands of hole-punched loyalty cards oozing from every crack in the truck testify to the popularity of the truck and the regularity with which its patrons return. (While Hillhouse and Grove is their usual corner, the Jitter Bus is available for booking for events and festivals.)

A digital stroll through the Jitter Bus’ social media (follow The Jitter Bus on Facebook and on Instagram @jitterbuscoffee) reveals engine troubles, brutal weather, and the occasional celebrated appearance of Nari, a friend’s dog. The labor needed to make repairs on the bus, both Dan and Paul say, is the worst part about working for themselves. But still, they wouldn’t have it any other way.

[Source:-.connecticutmag]

Stanford University dumps Java as an introductory programming language

It’s pretty much known to anyone in the programming world that Java is one of the hardest languages to learn right off the bat; that is if you’ve never written a line of code in your life. Well, Stanford University agrees, and has decided that to make programming more accessible to its students, something drastic had to be done.

In its latest update to the Programming Methodology course code CS 106J, the University replaced the difficult to master Java language that was present in CS 106A, with the more palatable language JavaScript. Even though to the layman the difference might seem arbitrary just from the namesake; but in reality, this makes programming easier to understand mainly due to the latter having less ‘bloat’ to contend with.

This change was spearheaded by Eric Roberts, an Emeritus Professor, who pioneered the CS 106 series. When he joined the University, programming was still based on Pascal. After Java became a popular language, Stanford enthusiastically transitioned. But according to this Professor, Java is ‘showing its age’, and he has been working on this project for the past five years, writing new textbooks and the like. This move is aimed at completely transition to JavaScript for the CS 106 program because of the fact that according to Roberts, it has become the ‘language of the internet’.

A small example of the difference between the two languages makes it pretty clear that it might be time for a change.

Hello World app built in Java:

class HelloWorld {
public static void main(String[] args) {
System.out.println(“Hello, world!”);
}
}

Now that same app built in JavaScript:

alert(‘Hello, world!’);

Although Java currently holds the top spot when it comes to programming languages, making it easier for students to learn programming will encourage them to acquire these skills. Java is being used to program applications for Android amongst other things, which makes it a requirement when working in the programming field. But this change is mainly there to help students get into the concepts behind programming, instead of drowning them in ‘Public Static Void’ like jargon.

With the digital world becoming more enshrined with our daily lives, having more educated people know how to code will only benefit us in the long run. As for how successful this change in language will be at retaining students in the long haul, remains to be seen.

[“Source-neowin”]

KOTLIN: THE UPSTART CODING LANGUAGE CONQUERING SILICON VALLEY

YOU’LL FIND MILLIONS of apps in the Google Play store, many of them written using the powerful, stable, workhorse programming language Java. If it were a car, Java would feature a fast, reliable engine but not antilock brakes, power steering, or cup holders. Totally drivable. Not exactly a joy ride.

In May Google gave Android developers another option when it announced it would start supporting a new programming language called Kotlin, which offers most of the same basic features as Java plus the coding equivalent of seat warmers and a killer sound system. This means programmers can write safer, more reliable code with less work. That’s good news for users because it should translate into apps with fewer bugs and crashes. But it’s even better news for programmers, because it means spending more time working on the interesting parts of code and less on more routine matters—the things that make programming a rewarding career or hobby. “Working with it just brings a smile to your face,” says Christina Lee, an Android developer at Pinterest and Kotlin enthusiast.

Companies like Pinterest, Basecamp, and Square had already been using it, but now that it has the official support of Google, you can expect to find Kotlin in more and more places. “Kotlin is what our development community has already asked for,” Android product manager Stephanie Saad Cuthbertson said during the announcement of Kotlin support at Google’s IO conference in May.

Works Well With Others

Although the first official release of Kotlin came only last year, the language has a history that stretches back to 2010. It was created by a Czech company called JetBrains, which makes software for programmers and project managers. But the team didn’t make Kotlin to sell. They made it to solve their own development problems.

More than 70 percent of its products were built with Java, says Hadi Hariri, a developer evangelist at JetBrains, but most of the rest were written in Microsoft’s C# language. The team saw a lot to like in C#, and were getting sick of some of Java’s old fashioned ways. Using Java means writing out lots of code that other languages tend to handle automatically. Something as simple as printing the phrase “Hello World” can take up three lines of code in Java, but usually only takes three words in modern languages.

That means extra work, much of it fairly repetitive. And all that extra code—”verbosity” in programming lingo—makes programs more cluttered and makes it easier to make mistakes. “The biggest issue with programming languages is that when you look at some code, you’ve got to figure out what the code is doing,” says Hariri. “It translates into a lot of noise that really isn’t necessary to understand the problem it’s trying to solve.”

The JetBrains teams really wanted to use a more modern language, but they still had many applications written in Java that would need to be maintained. It just wasn’t practical to re-write all of their existing Java applications in C# or some other language. What they needed was a language that was compatible with Java, so that they could add new features to old applications using the new language without completely rewriting the applications from scratch.

A few such options existed. Scala was gaining popularity at the time, thanks in part to its use at Twitter. But Hariri says it wasn’t as fast or as simple as the JetBrains crew would have liked. “It’s a very powerful language that, if misused, could end up badly,” he says. Groovy and Clojure, meanwhile, employed different programming paradigms altogether.

So the JetBrains team built their own language that had all the features they wanted and a strong focus on compatibility with Java. And instead of keeping the project internal, JetBrains open-sourced the project. JetBrains doesn’t profit directly from Kotlin’s use among developers, but the company hopes to make money off of it through increased interest in their Kotlin-supporting core products. Perhaps more importantly, JetBrains benefits from giving away Kotlin for free in the form of feedback and improvements from the larger Java community.

The company released a preview version of the language in 2011, and it turned out many other people were looking for something along those lines. One of them, Jake Wharton, an Android engineer at payments company Square, has been following Kotlin since its beginning. “Once you start using the language you can tell it was built by someone who spent a lot of time programming in Java,” Wharton says.

In 2015, he prepared a document to explain to his bosses at Square why they should sign-off on his Kotlin use. He published the paper on the web and soon many other people were using it to sell their bosses on Kotlin. “Jake’s well known in the Android community, he’s written open source libraries that we all use,” says Dan Kim, an Android developer at the software company Basecamp, says about Whaton’s paper. “It showed people that if Jake believes in it, it’s got at least a shot at being pretty good.”

But there was a catch. Although it was possible to build Android apps with Kotlin without Google’s official support, it was a risk. If Google made changes to the way Android worked, apps written in an unsupported language might not work the way developers intended. And if Google ended up announcing support for, say, Apple’s Swift or its own language Go, many managers might be left feeling they’d bet on the wrong horse. Google’s announcement last May meant that companies could adopt Kotlin without fear.

To Android and Beyond

Although one of Kotlin’s biggest selling points is that it can be mixed and matched with Java, it has appeal far beyond companies with vast amounts of old Java code they still need to use. Lee started using Kotlin at the startup Math Camp before it was acquired by Pinterest simply because her team thought it was the best language for their needs. “We started from scratch,” she says. “The app was 100 percent Kotlin, there was no Java in there.”

And its applications extend well beyond Google’s platform. Like Java, it can be used to write apps that run on desktops and servers as well. Plus, JetBrains has released tools for translating Kotlin code into code that can run on iOS or even in web browsers. All of which is to say, you can expect to find yourself using apps written in Kotlin more and more often in the coming months and years. Let’s just hope those virtual cup holders to bring a smile to users’ faces as well as coders’ faces.

[Source:-Wired]

Get your Java errors under control with error monitoring

Java errors

Java became a go-to language for Web-facing applications and Internet projects. However, the use of Java is not without its potential pitfalls, and that’s something that’s important for developers to keep in mind. In this article, AJ Philips teaches you how to get your Java errors under control with error monitoring.

The Java programming language is immensely popular with developers and has been for many years. It’s not just a case of having another object-oriented programming language to build applications with – Java’s rise coincided with the emergence of embedded web programming.

Java became a go-to language for Web-facing applications and Internet projects.
However, the use of Java is not without its potential pitfalls, and that’s something that’s important for developers to keep in mind.

The root of the problem(s)

Some of the common code problems in Java relate to the semantics that programmers use to build a code base. Without the right syntax, compiler errors and other errors can result.

Consider the omission of a closing bracket or parenthesis on a declaration or command. This type of mistake will generate an “expected” error and has to be fixed for proper execution. Another similar error is the “unclosed string error” where a string is not closed out with a quotation mark.

Another common error called “incompatible types” happens when integers or strings or other data types are used improperly, or combined in ways that don’t work for the program. Trying to assign one type of data type variable to another may create an “incompatible type” error. Other malformed syntax can produce an error called “invalid method declaration” or an “unreachable statement” error, or one stating an operator cannot be applied correctly.

What all of these mistakes have in common is that they arise from syntax that’s not properly and precisely controlled. It only takes one keystroke to make the errors, and they’re a minefield for programmers who may be meticulous in their writing, but still experience the occasional misplaced character while typing.

SEE ALSO: The error tracking tools Java developers should know

Automating the error correction

In the early days of object-oriented programming, there weren’t a lot of tools to catch the errors. Code base work could be tedious and labor-intensive – programmers had to catch the errors or fight them when trying to compile the program. This generated a lot of protocol in programming offices and oversight of individual programmers and their work.

Today’s developers have other options — the advance of digital analytics means programs can be created to automate some of the error correction that used to be done by hand.

These types of automation programs are immensely valuable in developer communities. Developers understand that they can bring products to market more quickly, fine-tune a codebase, and work more efficiently with tools that feature automated processes. Many of these tools also have combined features offering more research capability, so that developers can work better on the fly and do various kinds of required investigation while they are putting code together.

Improving the world of Java

The Stackify platform has a lot of this valuable functionality in place. Stackify looks at blogs, monitoring, metrics and available tools, and offers developers real assistance or getting where they need to go. The company calls the products “a magical developer map” in which professionals can find problems quickly and solve them actively and decisively.

When it comes to assisting developers, insight and transparency are key. Troubleshooting application problems can lead developers down some very dark paths — and without modern tools like Stackify, troubleshooting can take a lot of time. However, with these new tools and platforms, there is a way through these complicated processes. Stackify Retrace helps developers to effectively retrace what the code is doing so that bugs and glitches have nowhere to hide. Take a look at how Stackify can improve the world of Java.

[“Source-jaxenter”]