Java 9 to address GTK GUI pains on Linux

Plans are afoot to have Java 9 accommodate the GTK 3 GUI toolkit on Linux systems. The move would bring Java current with the latest version of the toolkit and prevent application failure due to mixing of versions.

The intention, according to a Java enhancement proposal on openjdk.net, would be to support GTK (GIMP Toolkit) 2 by default, with GTK 3 used when indicated by a system property. Java graphical applications based on JavaFX, Swing, or AWT (Advanced Window Toolkit) would be accommodated under the plan, and existing applications could run on Linux without modification with either GTK 2 or 3.

The proposal was sent to the openjfx-dev mailing list by Oracle’s Mark Reinhold, chief architect of the Java platform group at the company, which oversees Java’s development. Java 9 is expected to be available in March 2017.

“There are a number of Java packages that use GTK. These include AWT/Swing, JavaFX, and SWT. SWT has migrated to GTK 3, though there is a system property that can be used to force it to use the older version,” the proposal states. “This mixing of packages using different GTK versions causes application failures.”

The issue particularly affects applications when using the Eclipse development platform. The proposal also notes that while GTK 2 and 3 are now available by default on Linux distributions, this may not always be the case.

Also identified as GTK+, the cross-platform toolkit features widgets and an API and is offered as free software via the GNU Project. It has been used in projects ranging from the Apache OpenOffice office software suite to the Inkscape vector graphics editor to the PyShare image uploader.

An alternative to backing both GTK 2 and 3, according to the Java proposal, would be to migrate Java graphics to support only GTK 3, thus reducing efforts required in porting and testing. But this plan could result in a higher number of bugs not detected by testing, require additional effort with the AWT look and feel, and necessitate both or neither of JavaFX/Swing being ported. Such a port also would require more coordination between AWT and Swing.

But a former Java official at Sun Microsystems questioned the demand for this improvement to Java. “I’ve not seen very many Java-based desktop applications on Linux, so not sure how big a market this is addressing,” said Arun Gupta, vice president of developer advocacy at Couchbase and a former member of the Java EE team at Sun.

 
[Source:- Javaworld]

 

Java finally gets microservices tools

Java finally gets microservices tools

Lightbend, formerly known as Typesafe, is bringing microservices-based architectures to Java with its Lagom platform.

Due in early March, Lagom is a microservices framework that lightens the burden of developing microservices in Java. Built on the Scala functional language, open source Lagom acts as a development environment for managing microservices. APIs initially are provided for Java services, with Scala to follow.

The framework features Lightbend’s Akka middleware technologies as well as its ConductR microservices deployment tool and Play Web framework. Applications are deployed to Lightbend’s commercial Reactive platform for message-driven applications or via open source Akka.

Lightbend sees microservices as loosely coupled, isolated, single-responsibility services, each owning its own data and easily composed into larger systems. Lagom provides for asynchronous communications and event-sourcing, which is storing the event leading up to particular states in an event, company officials said.

Analyst James Governor of RedMonk sees an opportunity for Lagom. “The Java community needs good tools for creating and managing microservices architectures,” he said. “Lagom is squarely aimed at that space.”

Lagom would compete with the Spring Boot application platform in some areas, according to Governor. “It is early days for Lagom, but the design points make sense,” he noted. Typesafe was focused on Scala, which was adopted in some industries, such as financial services, but never became mainstream, he argues. “So [the company now] is looking to take its experiences and tooling and make them more generally applicable with a Java-first strategy.”

 

[Source:- Javaworld]

GitLab 8.5 pours on the speed

GitLab 8.5 pours on the speed

GitLab this week upgraded its code-hosting platform, emphasizing performance and adding to-do list and remote replica capabilities.

GitLab 8.5 is lot faster, said Job van der Voort, GitLab vice president of product at the company, in a posting about the upgrade. “Average mean performance is up at least 1.4 times, up to 1.6 times for 99th percentile response times. For slower pages, the response time has been improved way beyond this.”

The new version features Todos, a chronological list of to-dos. “Whenever you’re assigned to an issue or merge request or have someone mention you, a new to-do is created automatically,” said van der Voort. GitLab 8.5 Enterprise, meanwhile, features an alpha version of Geo, providing for a remote replica of a Geo instance. Geo makes it quicker to work with large repositories over large distances, and this instance can be used for cloning and fetching projects as well as for reading data.

The GitLab Pages feature for hosting a static website under a separate domain name now backs TLS (Transport Layer Security) certificates and custom domains, and users can upload their own certificates. “The new functionality of GitLab Pages was made possible with the help of a new HTTP server written in Go,” van der Voort said. “We call it the GitLab Pages daemon GitLab Pages daemon, and it supports dynamic certificates through SNI and exposes pages using HTTP2 by default.”

GitLab is vying against juggernaut code-sharing site GitHub in the Git repository market. The latest upgrade follows the release of Gitlab 8.4, the 50th release of the platform, by about a month.

 

[Source:- Javaworld]