How Age And Income May Show You Back ‘Brexit’

screengrab from VJU video 2

Eurosceptics have brought down prime ministers, dismantled governments and generally been a thorn in the side of leading politicians for decades.

In finally giving them the referendum they craved, David Cameron has, for now, amplified their voices further.

But who are the Eurosceptics, and why do they want to leave the European Union?

There are two key groups who tend to support a Brexit: older people and poorer people.

The impact of this can be seen in the likes of Clacton – the only parliamentary seat held by UKIP, whose local authority of Tendring is rated as the most Eurosceptic in Britain according to our Sky Data Brexit map.

UK Brexit Map

The least Eurosceptic areas of Britain are in yellow, the most in blue

In this Essex constituency, there are more pensioners than full-time workers, and more than half of voters are on incomes of less than £15,000 per year.

The factors which indicate someone supports a Brexit also manifest themselves in other, less obvious ways.

For example, Sky Data analysis shows Waitrose shoppers are more likely to vote Remain, while those who shop at Aldi are more likely to vote Leave.

Luxury car owners are more likely to be Europhiles, while those who drive small utility cars tend to be more Eurosceptic.

And more obscurely, if you like going fishing, you’re more likely to support the Out campaign – with the reverse being true of cinemagoers.

The main issue driving Leave supporters is immigration.

Two in three Britons (63%) say immigration has had a negative effect on British culture.

Boris Johnson at Vote Leave EU rally in Manchester

The EU is also seen as having a particularly negative impact for unskilled British workers, for whom 42% of Britons think the EU is a bad thing, compared with 16% who think it’s beneficial.

In short, poorer people are worried about their jobs and think their wages are being undercut, while older people feel alienated and intimidated by a multicultural, polylingual Britain that they don’t recognise.

On the other hand, data from YouGov shows the EU is seen as a good thing for our influence on the world stage, employment in the UK generally, and keeping prices down.

For now, neither side is winning the argument on the terrorist threat, nor on the economy – though we shall see if this week’s Treasury forecast of a Brexit costing each UK household £4,300 per year has an impact.

The fact only half of Britons say they have enough information to make an informed decision suggests that opinions may yet be changed ahead of June’s referendum.

 
[Source:- Skynews]

Sally Faulkner: father of children says attempted kidnap charge stands

Ali al-Amin says he does not intend to drop charges against his estranged Australian wife over attempt to seize children

Sally Faulkner and Tara Brown
Lebanese police escort Sally Faulkner (centre, in black) and 60 Minutes reporter Tara Brown (right) from court in Beirut. Photograph: Wael Hamzeh/EPA

The father of two children at the centre of a botched child recovery operation inLebanon has said he is in no hurry to resolve the case and does not intend to drop charges of attempted kidnapping against his estranged Australian wife.

Speaking inside the Baabda palace of justice, a defiant Ali al-Amin contradictedstatements made last week that he was open to compromise on the charges laid against Sally Faulkner.

The judge, Rami Abdullah, adjourned the case until Wednesday to allow talks to continue.

Faulkner, from Brisbane, flew to Lebanon this month with a news crew from theChannel Nine programme 60 Minutes in an attempt to seize the couple’s children from a street in south Beirut.

Tara Brown, the correspondent for 60 Minutes, and Adam Whittington, the founder of Child Abduction Recovery International, are among seven people also facing charges over the operation. The others include the 60 Minutes cameraman Benjamin Williamson, producer Stephen Rice, and sound recordist David Ballment.

Amin suggested on Monday that if he agreed to drop charges against his ex-wife, he would also make it more likely that the 60 Minutes crew, Whittington and two others involved in the operation, would be freed too.

“They are trying to push for that if Sally gets bail, they all get bail,” he said. “I said then I will charge everyone involved and I say it today. It will take some time. I am in no hurry.”

Amin appeared confident and unhurried, in contrast to Faulkner who seemed tired and distressed when she was brought before the judge. Brown also appeared briefly in chambers.

Abdullah said a hearing for the group had been postponed because another case had taken precedent. Under Lebanon’s inquisitorial judicial system, pre-trial hearings can be part mediation sessions and part interrogation.

Amin took five-year-old Lahela and three-year-old Noah to Lebanon almost a year ago. Faulkner, who was separated from Amin, then involved a child recovery team, which arranged to seize them.

The operation was successful, but the team behind it was quickly seized. All involved, including Faulkner, were arrested.

Whittington’s lawyer said he was expected to have presented documents to the court that showed 60 Minutes had paid him in two tranches.

60 Minutes’ Ross Coulthart talks about the crew in Lebanon

A lawyer for 60 Minutes, Kamal Abou Daher, admitted that Channel Nine had paid for the story, but attempted to draw a distinction between the legal fight for custody of the children and the abduction itself.

“Ali’s lawyers said it and you heard yourself, they are not in a hurry,” he said. “This changed after the last hearing.”

Speaking inside his chambers, Abdullah said he had no preference for how the case progressed from here. “Of course, if everything is negotiated it is better,” he said. “However that is up to the parties.”

On Sunday, the 60 Minutes host Ross Coulthart said the programme’s detained crew members were “said to be in good spirits and coping well”. Brown has said she was being “well-treated in a women’s detention centre”, he said, while her male colleagues were held separately.

On Monday, prominent Channel Nine journalists rallied to support Brown and the rest of the crew before the hearing.

60 Minutes’ apparent decision to cover the costs of the child recovery operation has faced intense scrutiny, but a number of Australian journalists have now come to the show’s defence.

On Monday, Tracy Grimshaw defended the crew in an article for the Australian, saying they were not “tabloid cowboys”.

“They are not a threat to society. That’s probably the biggest Captain Obvious statement you will read all day. They are good people who care about what they do, who love their families and friends and are loved very much back,” she wrote.

 

 [Source:- Gurdian]

Everybody Loves Raymond Star Doris Roberts Dies

Actress Doris Roberts

Doris Roberts, who played Marie Barone in the long-running sitcom Everybody Loves Raymond, has died at the age of 90.

The veteran actress passed away in her sleep at her home in Los Angeles, a family spokeswoman said.

Her cause of death has not been made public, but a statement said the Missouri-born actress had been healthy and active.

Roberts’ performance as Ray Romano’s meddlesome mother in the TV comedy about a dysfunctional family was one of her best-known roles.

Cast members pose for group photo at the series wrap party of "Everybody Loves Raymond" in California.

Roberts pictured with the cast of Everybody Loves Raymond in 2005

Upon hearing of her death, Romano said: “Doris Roberts had an energy and a spirit that amazed me. She never stopped.

“Whether working professionally or with her many charities, or just nurturing and mentoring a green young comic trying to make it as an actor, she did everything with such a grand love for life and people and I will miss her dearly.”

During Everybody Loves Raymond’s nine-year run, she won the outstanding supporting actress in a comedy series award at the Emmys four times – and was nominated a further three times.

In 1983, she also won the outstanding supporting actress in a drama series award for her role in the medical soap opera St Elsewhere.

After Everybody Loves Raymond came to an end in 2005, she made guest appearances in other well-known TV shows such as Grey’s Anatomy and Desperate Housewives.

Phil Rosenthal, who created Everybody Loves Raymond, tweeted: “We loved our mom, the great Doris Roberts. A wonderful, funny, indelible actress and friend.”

She is survived by her son, Michael, and three grandchildren.

 

[Source:- Skynews]

Ecuador earthquake death toll passes 400 with many still trapped

More than 300 aftershocks recorded and Spanish Red Cross says as many as 100,000 people may need assistance

People in Pedernales
People in Pedernales, one of the towns worst hit by the earthquake. Photograph: Rodrigo Buendia/AFP/Getty Images

The death toll from the 7.8-magnitude earthquake in Ecuador has risen to 413, and many survivors are believed to still be trapped inside collapsed buildings.

The government announced the updated toll on Monday night. The security minister, César Navas, said rescuers were continuing to search for victims and survivors.

More than 300 aftershocks have rattled Ecuador in the 36 hours since Saturday’s quake, some measuring as high as magnitude 6.1, according to the country’s Geophysics Institute.

Ecuador’s president, Rafael Correa, said citizens would pull together after the disaster. “The Ecuadorian spirit knows how to move forward, and will know how to overcome these very difficult moments,” he said.

Early on Monday, rescuers pulled three people from the rubble alive after they had spent more than 32 hours trapped in the ruins of a shopping centre in the city of Manta.

Firefighters cut a 70cm hole in concrete to pull out two women and a young man, who were rushed to a nearby hospital. A third woman remained trapped and was being given water while rescuers tried to lift a concrete slab pinning down her legs.

More than 2,500 people were injured in the disaster, which brought down housing blocks and air traffic control towers, buckled bridges and cracked pavements. In the coastal town of Chamanga, authorities estimated that more than 90% of homes had been damaged.

At least 100 of those killed in the quake were citizens of the regional capital Portoviejo. They included the Quinde family – a mother, father, teenage daughter and toddler son – killed when a four-storey hotel collapsed on their car.

The Quindes were en route to drop off Sayira, 17, for her first term at university, where she had won a scholarship to study medicine. “I never thought my life would be destroyed in a minute,” her aunt Johana Estupiñan told AP.

Few buildings in the city centre had escaped damage: some had lost a few bricks, but others had been reduced to rubble. “It looks like there’s been a war,” said Cesar Velasco, who works for a transport company.

At the Aki supermarket market, survivors stocked up on bottled water, juices, bread – and styrofoam plates to replace shattered crockery. Elsewhere in the provincial capital of 300,000, there were reports of looting as survivors stole clothing and shoes from shattered buildings.

On the road to Portoviejo, a steady stream of ambulances transported the critically injured from the region toward hospitals in Guayaquil, which is 130 miles away and not as severely affected by the earthquake.

At a girls’ school in Playa Prieta, six members of staff including a Northern Irish nun were killed when the building collapsed. Sister Clare, 33, from Derry, was a nun in the Home of the Mother order. Her family said they believed she had been trying to lead colleagues out of the school to safety when a stairwell collapsed.

“She was trying to get them down the stairs and the staircase collapsed. We knew she was trapped but information has been slow to come out,” her cousin Emmet Doyle said. “She died as she lived, helping others.”

Two Canadian citizens, mother and son Jennifer and Arthur Flawn from Quebec, were also among the dead, the family confirmed to Canada’s CTV News.

Warning of the continued risk of aftershocks, radio and television broadcasts recommended residents have a small backpack ready with water, tinned tuna and a flashlight near the door of their homes.

The Spanish Red Cross said as many as 100,000 people may need assistance in holiday towns and fishing villages in the more remote regions near the epicentre of the quake, where citizens have been sleeping outside among the ruins.

The charity said it estimated that 3,000 to 5,000 people needed temporary housing. About 800 volunteers and staff members with the Ecuadorian Red Cross were involved with search and rescue operations and helping provide first aid.

Spain has sent a military plane with 47 search and rescue experts and their five dogs to Ecuador, and it is expected to arrive in Guayaquil on Monday afternoon. Other rescue teams have flown in from Mexico and Colombia.

Local radio reported that two lorries filled with emergency supplies had been carjacked as they headed to the worst-affected areas.

[Source:- Gurdian]

US feels ‘overwhelming frustration’ with Israeli government, says Biden

Vice-president’s public remarks show continued strain between the countries in the wake of Iranian nuclear deal

US vice-president Joe Biden during his visit to Jerusalem in March
US vice-president Joe Biden during his visit to Jerusalem in March. Photograph: Sipa/Rex/Shutterstock

The US vice-president, Joe Biden, has delivered an unusually sharp critique of the government of Binyamin Netanyahu, saying the Israeli prime minister is leading Israel in the wrong direction through his policies, including settlement building.

Biden described the Obama administration’s “overwhelming frustration” withIsrael, adding that “profound questions” existed about how the country could remain both Jewish and democratic.

Although Biden’s comments, made in a speech to the Jewish American group J-Street, also criticised Palestinians for the failure of the last round of Middle East peace talks, his remarks about the Netanyahu government were particularly pointed.

“I firmly believe that the actions that Israel’s government has taken over the past several years – the steady and systematic expansion of settlements, the legalisation of outposts, land seizures – they’re moving us and more importantly they’re moving Israel in the wrong direction,” Biden said.

His remarks appear to have scotched the notion that relations between Israel and its most significant backer – which have been unusually strained – were returning to normal after the deep frictions over the Iran nuclear deal.

Biden insisted, however, that the US remained committed to Israel’s security.

“No matter what political disagreements we have with Israel – and we do have political disagreements now – there is never any question about our commitment to Israel’s security.”

Biden’s comments will concern senior Israeli politicians. They have been fretting over what stance the US might take over a mooted resolution at the UN security council, being pushed by Palestinians, seeking to condemn Israel’s continued construction of illegal settlements.

Although Biden’s remarks echoed both public and private comments in recent months made by senior American officials, their high-profile nature is significant, not least because they come in the midst of stalled negotiations between the US and Israel over a military aid package with demands from Israel for more aid than the US is willing to give.

“Israel will not get everything it asks for, but it will get every single solitary thing it needs,” Biden remarked.

The US vice-president also added his voice to the increasing number of international figures warning that Israelis and Palestinians were heading towards a “dangerous” one-state “reality” – and the effective death of a two-state solution.

In March, Biden met both Netanyahu and the Palestinian president, Mahmoud Abbas. He said he came away from that trip discouraged about prospects for peace anytime soon, adding it was the US’s obligation to “push … as hard as we can” towards a two-state solution despite “our sometimes overwhelming frustration with the Israeli government”.

Biden added: “There is at the moment no political will that I observed from either Israelis or Palestinians to go forward with serious negotiations.

“Both sides have to take responsibility for counterproductive steps that undermine confidence in negotiations.”

Biden also singled out Palestinian leaders, including Abbas, for declining to condemn specific acts of terrorism carried out against Israelis, in a nod to the seven-month wave of Palestinian stabbings and other attacks. He said he didn’t know whether Monday’s bus explosion in Jerusalem was a terrorist attack, but added that the US condemns “misguided cowards” who resort to violence.

“No matter what legitimate disagreements the Palestinian people have with Israel, there is never justification for terrorism,” Biden said. “No leader should fail to condemn as terrorists those who commit such brutalities.”

[Source:- Gurdian]

Kabul hit by deadly explosion as Taliban begins spring offensive

At least 28 people have been killed and scores injured after a Taliban car bomb exploded in a crowded area of Kabul near ministries and government offices, and a gun battle ensued between attackers and security forces.

The heavily laden car exploded shortly before 9am local time outside the office of a security detail responsible for protecting Afghan government VIPs and officials, according to police sources.

The blast ripped through the city, rattling windows several miles away, and was followed by gunfire as attackers took cover in nearby buildings. A Taliban spokesman claimed responsibility for the attack, which came a week after the insurgents launched their annual spring offensive.

Afghan security officials at the site of the Kabul blast.
Afghan security officials at the site of the Kabul blast. Photograph: Hedayatullah Amid/EPA

Obaidullah Tarakhail, a police commander who was at the scene when the attack began, told the Associated Press: “This was one of the most powerful explosions I have ever heard in my life.” Tarakhail said he could not see or hear anything for 20 minutes after the initial explosion. “All around was dark and covered with thick smoke and dust,” he said.

Kabul’s police chief, Abdul Rahman Rahimi, told reporters at the scene that 28 people had been killed. He said the attack left 183 injured, but a spokesman for the public health ministry put that figure at 327. The casualty figures are expected to rise.

Emergency, an Italian-run hospital for war wounded in Kabul, said it had received 22 casualties, most of them members of the security forces, and most lightly injured. Luca Radaelli, Emergency’s medical coordinator, said numbers could rise because it had been difficult to evacuate victims while the fighting continued.

Sediq Sediqqi, an Afghan interior ministry spokesman, said the suicide bombing was followed by an assault by armed militants. “One armed terrorist was shot and killed by security forces and the gun battle is still under way with an unknown number of other terrorists,” he said. A spokesman for the Kabul police chief later said the gun battle in the compound had ended.

President Ashraf Ghani said in a statement: “[We] condemn in the strongest terms the terrorist attack in Puli Mahmood Khan neighbourhood of Kabul, as a result of which many of our countrymen were martyred and wounded. Such cowardly terrorist attacks will not weaken the will and determination of Afghan security forces to fight against terrorism.”

The Afghan government, backed by its international allies, has for months tried to convince the insurgents to restart peace talks, but so far to no avail.

While the spring fighting season normally heralds intensified attacks, winter was unusually violent, with sustained Taliban offensives around the country and several attacks on the capital.

In January, the Taliban attacked a restaurant in Kabul frequented by foreigners and affluent Afghans, killing a guard and a 12-year-old boy. Later that month, the militant group killed seven employees of TOLO TV in an attack on one of the media group’s buses.

On Sunday, the UN released a report documenting a slight increase in civilian casualties in the first three months of 2016, compared with the same period last year.

The report also showed that while the Taliban have scaled down their use of improvised explosive devices and targeted killings, the militants are increasingly using complex and suicide attacks in populated areas.

[Source:- Gurdian]

Israel uncovers Hamas tunnel from Gaza, says new war unlikely

Israel said on Monday it had unearthed a new cross-border tunnel dug by Hamas militants from the Gaza Strip, the first such discovery since the 2014 war, but played down the prospect of renewed conflict.

Since being blindsided by Hamas tunnel raiders during the war, Israel has, with U.S. help, stepped up work on technologies for spotting the secret passages. Some Israelis who live on the Gaza frontier believe militants are digging fresh tunnels and worry the counter-measures will come too late.

The tunnel made public on Monday was discovered days earlier but kept under wraps by Israel as it probed what it said were hundreds of metres (yards) of shafts on the Israeli side of the border near southeast Gaza. The network was then razed.

“We have neutralised the tunnel in Israeli territory, rendering it unusable for infiltration by Hamas terrorists,” said Lieutenant-Colonel Peter Lerner, a military spokesman.

Asked how the tunnel was discovered, he declined to give specifics, citing only “a combination of technology, intelligence, engineering capabilities and boots on the ground”.

“We estimate that this tunnel was mostly built after Protective Edge,” Lerner said, using Israel’s term for the Gaza war, during which it lost 12 soldiers to Hamas gunmen who burrowed across the border on four occasions.

Hamas, which has largely held fire since the war, implicitly claimed the tunnel as its own.

“What the enemy announced is only a drop in the sea of what the resistance has prepared to defend its people and liberate its sacred sites, its land and its prisoners,” Hamas’s armed wing, Izz el-Deen Al-Qassam, said in a statement.

Israel has signalled the mere existence of a tunnel – as opposed to its use for an attack – may not be a casus belli.

“We do not seek conflict, but if Hamas tries to provoke the State of Israel and disrupt the lives of residents of the Gaza periphery communities, it will be dealt a very strong blow,” Defence Minister Moshe Yaalon said in a statement on Monday.

The Gaza war killed more than 2,100 Palestinians and devastated parts of the enclave. Gaza medical sources and U.N. officials say most were civilians, a figure disputed by Israel, which lost 67 troops and six civilians to the fighting.

The Gaza periphery is now mostly quiet, except for occasional Palestinian rocket attacks Israel says were carried out by Islamist groups that view Hamas as too lenient.

Despite the apparent role of Israeli technology in discovering the tunnel, officials say a more reliable counter-measure, comparable to the Iron Dome interceptor for rockets, is still not in place.

 

[Source:- Reauters]

Six corpses found in migrant boat, 108 rescued: Italy coast guard

Six bodies were recovered and 108 migrants were rescued from a semi-submerged rubber dinghy, Italy’s coast guard said on Monday, as boat arrivals accelerate amid calm seas.

A private rescue ship called Aquarius run by humanitarian group SOS Mediterranee found the bodies on the rubber dingy on Sunday, a coast guard spokesman said. Five women were among those rescued. The coast guard had no details about the nationality of the migrants.

The migrants and the six corpses are being taken to the Italian island of Lampedusa, the coast guard said.

Separately, Italy’s coast guard rescued 33 migrants from a small island off the eastern coast of Sicily on Sunday.

Almost 6,000 migrants and refugees sailed from Libya to Italy last week in what appears the start of a wave of at least 100,000 and “possibly many, many more” this year, the International Organization for Migration said on Friday.

 

[Source:- Reauters]

Syrian rebels declare new battle against government

Syrian rebel groups announced a new battle against government forces on Monday, a sign of escalating violence that has undermined a ceasefire deal and threatens to derail U.N.-led peace talks.

The groups, which included factions fighting under the banner of the Free Syrian Army and powerful Islamist Ahrar al-Sham, said in a statement they would respond “with force” against any government forces that fired on civilians.

The ceasefire deal has been strained to breaking point by escalating fighting, particularly around the divided city of Aleppo, with each side blaming the other for the escalation that has underlined the huge challenge facing the peace talks. Heavy air strikes have also been reported north of Homs.

Senior opposition figures who have asked not to be quoted have said pressure is growing for a speedy decision to leave talks being convened by U.N. envoy Staffan de Mistura in Geneva, with no sign of progress towards discussion of a political transition sought by President Bashar al-Assad’s opponents.

The statement announced the “formation of a joint operations room to begin the battle… in response to violations by the army of Assad.” It gave no geographic location for the new battle.

Senior Syrian opposition negotiators on Sunday urged rebels to strike back against the Syrian army, accusing it of using a cessation of hostilities to gain ground, and cast doubt over whether they would continue Geneva peace talks indefinitely.

The cessation of hostilities agreement brokered by the United States and Russia came into effect on Feb. 27 with the aim of allowing peace talks to get underway. The agreement did not include Islamic State or the al Qaeda-linked Nusra Front.

 

[Source:- Reauters]

Shaken Ecuador hunts for survivors amid 7.8 quake debris

Traumatized Ecuadoreans slept amid rubble while rescuers dug for survivors on Monday after an earthquake smashed the Andean nation’s coastal region, killing at least 272 people and flattening resort towns.

Saturday’s 7.8 magnitude quake ripped apart buildings and roads, knocked out power, and injured at least 2,068 people in the largely poor Andean country.

In the devastated beach town of Pedernales, shaken survivors curled up for the night on mattresses or plastic chairs next to the rubble of their homes. Soldiers and police patrolled the hot, dark streets while pockets of rescue workers plowed on.

Late on Sunday, firefighters entered a partially destroyed house to search for three children and a man apparently trapped inside, as a crowd of 40 gathered in the darkness to watch.

“My little cousins are inside, before there were noises, screams. We must find them,” pleaded Isaac, 18, as the firemen combed the debris.

Tents sprung up in the town’s still-intact stadium to store bodies, treat the injured, and distribute water, food, and blankets to survivors. People wandered around with bruised limbs and bandaged cuts, while patients with more serious injuries were evacuated to hospitals.

Leftist President Rafael Correa, who cut short a visit to Italy, surveyed the damage in the coastal province of Manabi on Sunday night.

“Ecuador has been hit tremendously hard,” Correa said in a televised address, his voice breaking as he said he feared the death toll would rise from what he called a tragedy.

While the full extent of the damage remains unclear, the disaster will likely worsen the OPEC nation’s economic performance this year.

The small, oil-dependent country has already been battered by the tumble in crude prices.

Its crucial energy industry appears largely intact after the quake, though its main refinery of Esmeraldas was closed as a precaution. However, exports of bananas, flowers, cacao, and fish could be slowed by ruined roads and delays at ports.

The quake could also alter political dynamics ahead of next year’s presidential election.

About 230 aftershocks have rattled survivors, who huddled in the streets, worried the flow of tremors could topple their already cracked homes.

“We’re scared of being in the house,” said Yamil Faran, 47, surrounded by some 30 people in the middle of a street in the city of Portoviejo. “When this improves and the aftershocks stop we’re going to see if we can repair it.”

Some 130 inmates in Portoviejo took advantage of the quake’s destruction and chaos to climb over the collapsed walls of the low-security El Rodeo prison. More than 35 prisoners had been recaptured, authorities said on Sunday night.

About 13,500 security personnel were mobilized to keep order. Beyond a handful of unconfirmed reports of theft and looting, the country appeared calm.

Some $600 million in credit from multilateral lenders was immediately activated for the emergency, the government said.

Domestic aid funds were being set up and Venezuela, Chile and Mexico were sending personnel and supplies. The Ecuadorean Red Cross mobilized more than 800 volunteers and staff and medical charity Medecins Sans Frontieres said it was sending a team from Colombia.

Two Canadians were among the dead. Jennifer Mawn, 38, and her 12-year-old son Arthur, died when the roof of their coastal residence collapsed.

Residents on the Galapagos islands far off Ecuador’s coast and home to numerous rare species, said they had not been affected.

The tremor followed two large and deadly quakes that struck Japan since Thursday. Both countries are located on the seismically active “Ring of Fire” that circles the Pacific, but according to the U.S. Geological Survey large quakes separated by such distances would probably not be related.

 

[Source:- Reauters]