ANTIVIRUS FOR ANDROID HAS A LONG, LONG WAY TO GO

ANTIVIRUS PROGRAMS ON PCs have a mixed track record. While generally useful, they still have to play catch-up with evolving threats–and their deep system access has on occasion enabled even worse attacks. Now, as antivirus products gain in popularity for Android devices, they appear to be making many of the same old mistakes.

A key part of the current shortcomings stems from relative immaturity in Android antivirus offerings. Researchers at Georgia Tech who analyzed 58 mainstream options found that many were relatively easy to defeat, often because didn’t take a nuanced and diverse approach to malware detection. Taking on the mindset of an attacker, the researchers built a tool called AVPass that works to smuggle malware into a system without being detected by antivirus. Of the 58 programs AVPass tested, only two–from AhnLab and WhiteArmor–consistently stopped AVPass attacks.

“Antivirus for the mobile platform is really just starting for some companies—a lot of the antivirus for Android may even be their first iteration,” says Max Wolotsky, a PhD student at Georgia Tech who worked on the research. “We would definitely warn consumers that they should look into more than just AV. You want to be cautious.”

Modern antivirus uses machine-learning techniques to evolve with the malware field. So in creating AVPass, the researchers started by developing methods for defeating defensive algorithms they could access (like those created for academic research or other open-source projects) and then used these strategies as the basis for working out attacks against proprietary consumer antivirus—products where you can’t see the code powering them. The team will present on and release AVPass at the Black Hat hacking conference in Las Vegas on Thursday.

Free Pass

To test the 58 Android antivirus products and figure out what bypasses would work against each of them, the researchers used a service called VirusTotal, which attempts to identify links and malware samples by scanning them through a system that incorporates dozens of tools, and offering results about what each tool found. By querying VirusTotal with different malware components and seeing which tools flagged which samples, the researchers were able to form a picture of the type of detection features each antivirus has. Under an academic license, VirusTotal limited the group to fewer than 300 queries per malware sample, but the researchers say even this small number was adequate for gathering data on how the different services go about detecting malware.

Before this reconnaissance, the team developed a feature for AVPass called Imitation Mode, which shields the test samples submitted for antivirus scanning so the snippets themselves wouldn’t be identified and blacklisted. “The Imitation Mode is for our malware obfuscation,” says Chanil Jeon, another researcher who worked on the project. “We extract particular malware features and insert them into an empty app, so we can test which feature or which combination is important for malware detection.” The team worked with mainstream malware samples from malware libraries like VirusShare.com and DREBIN.

AVPass is an open source prototype, part of broader Georgia Tech research into machine-learning algorithms (like those used in antivirus) and the extent to which they can be manipulated and exploited. But it also serves as commentary on the evolving landscape of mobile defense.

Room To Grow

If there’s a silver lining here, it’s that Android antivirus tools have an easier job than their PC equivalents, at least for now. “Android malware is not much of malware at all compared to PC malware,” says Mohammad Mannan, a security researcher at Concordia University in Montreal who has studied antivirus vulnerabilities. “They are just rogue apps in most cases, so they are far easier to detect.” And Mannan notes that though Android antivirus apps have a lot of leeway in the system, they aren’t as privileged as antivirus apps on PCs, which could potentially cut down on concerns that antivirus can sometimes be exploited as a security vulnerability in itself. “Mobile AVs run like a privileged app, but are still just an app in the end, not part of the operating system or kernel,” he says.

For now, though, the potential advantages seem overshadowed by the immaturity of the market. The AVPass team says that Android antivirus developers need to build out their products so the programs are looking for multiple malicious attributes at once. It’s much easier to sneak past one security guard than 10. And they note that their research would have been much more difficult and time-consuming if tools like VirusTotal were less specific in the information they disclose about each service.

“These results aren’t the most surprising,” Wolotsky says. “We knew going into this as security researchers that the mobile domain is much less advanced. We hope AVPass will give [antivirus developers] a way to see what works and what doesn’t, because I’m not sure they’ve had that.”

[“Source-wired”]

ANTIVIRUS FOR ANDROID HAS A LONG, LONG WAY TO GO

ANTIVIRUS PROGRAMS ON PCs have a mixed track record. While generally useful, they still have to play catch-up with evolving threats–and their deep system access has on occasion enabled even worse attacks. Now, as antivirus products gain in popularity for Android devices, they appear to be making many of the same old mistakes.

A key part of the current shortcomings stems from relative immaturity in Android antivirus offerings. Researchers at Georgia Tech who analyzed 58 mainstream options found that many were relatively easy to defeat, often because didn’t take a nuanced and diverse approach to malware detection. Taking on the mindset of an attacker, the researchers built a tool called AVPass that works to smuggle malware into a system without being detected by antivirus. Of the 58 programs AVPass tested, only two–from AhnLab and WhiteArmor–consistently stopped AVPass attacks.

“Antivirus for the mobile platform is really just starting for some companies—a lot of the antivirus for Android may even be their first iteration,” says Max Wolotsky, a PhD student at Georgia Tech who worked on the research. “We would definitely warn consumers that they should look into more than just AV. You want to be cautious.”

Modern antivirus uses machine-learning techniques to evolve with the malware field. So in creating AVPass, the researchers started by developing methods for defeating defensive algorithms they could access (like those created for academic research or other open-source projects) and then used these strategies as the basis for working out attacks against proprietary consumer antivirus—products where you can’t see the code powering them. The team will present on and release AVPass at the Black Hat hacking conference in Las Vegas on Thursday.

Free Pass

To test the 58 Android antivirus products and figure out what bypasses would work against each of them, the researchers used a service called VirusTotal, which attempts to identify links and malware samples by scanning them through a system that incorporates dozens of tools, and offering results about what each tool found. By querying VirusTotal with different malware components and seeing which tools flagged which samples, the researchers were able to form a picture of the type of detection features each antivirus has. Under an academic license, VirusTotal limited the group to fewer than 300 queries per malware sample, but the researchers say even this small number was adequate for gathering data on how the different services go about detecting malware.

Before this reconnaissance, the team developed a feature for AVPass called Imitation Mode, which shields the test samples submitted for antivirus scanning so the snippets themselves wouldn’t be identified and blacklisted. “The Imitation Mode is for our malware obfuscation,” says Chanil Jeon, another researcher who worked on the project. “We extract particular malware features and insert them into an empty app, so we can test which feature or which combination is important for malware detection.” The team worked with mainstream malware samples from malware libraries like VirusShare.com and DREBIN.

AVPass is an open source prototype, part of broader Georgia Tech research into machine-learning algorithms (like those used in antivirus) and the extent to which they can be manipulated and exploited. But it also serves as commentary on the evolving landscape of mobile defense.

Room To Grow

If there’s a silver lining here, it’s that Android antivirus tools have an easier job than their PC equivalents, at least for now. “Android malware is not much of malware at all compared to PC malware,” says Mohammad Mannan, a security researcher at Concordia University in Montreal who has studied antivirus vulnerabilities. “They are just rogue apps in most cases, so they are far easier to detect.” And Mannan notes that though Android antivirus apps have a lot of leeway in the system, they aren’t as privileged as antivirus apps on PCs, which could potentially cut down on concerns that antivirus can sometimes be exploited as a security vulnerability in itself. “Mobile AVs run like a privileged app, but are still just an app in the end, not part of the operating system or kernel,” he says.

For now, though, the potential advantages seem overshadowed by the immaturity of the market. The AVPass team says that Android antivirus developers need to build out their products so the programs are looking for multiple malicious attributes at once. It’s much easier to sneak past one security guard than 10. And they note that their research would have been much more difficult and time-consuming if tools like VirusTotal were less specific in the information they disclose about each service.

“These results aren’t the most surprising,” Wolotsky says. “We knew going into this as security researchers that the mobile domain is much less advanced. We hope AVPass will give [antivirus developers] a way to see what works and what doesn’t, because I’m not sure they’ve had that.”

[Source:-Wired]

Nintendo’s solution for online voice chat feels half-baked

From the moment you pick up a Nintendo Switch, it feels like a magical device. The company nailed the hybrid TV / portable concept and created a genuinely fun console that seemed to shed the awkwardness of the Wii U. Indeed, Nintendo has a habit for making fun consoles — but for the last three generations, it’s failed to build online communication options on par with Xbox Live or PlayStation Network.

Rather than baking voice chat into the Switch itself, Nintendo’s new console relegates the feature to a companion smartphone app. We just tried it out and it works, but it’s messy, confusing and completely unintuitive.

The idea behind the Nintendo Switch Online app isn’t a bad one — it’s designed so players can access game data, communicate with other players and organize online matches with friends even when they are away from their consoles. Each game will have its own in-app hub with a bevy of options. You can use the app to access SplatNet 2, for instance, to view your match history in Splatoon 2, check which multiplayer maps are in rotation, and even use in-game currency to buy new gear for your character.

Most of those features work perfectly well — seeing how much ink I’ve spilled in Splatoon 2 is neat, as is the ability to see how I performed in the last 50 matches — but the communication aspect is where the experience falls apart. Using the Nintendo Switch Online app to join a voice chat in Splatoon 2 is both physically and logistically complicated.

Here’s how it works right now: Players who want to voice chat with friends need to visit the Online Lounge menu of Splatoon 2’s multiplayer lobby and create a room. This opens a private match and sends a notification to the player’s smartphone — where they can then invite friends to join them through their friends list, a shortlist of other players they’ve encountered in other voice chat sessions who aren’t on their friends list or via a link sent out over social media.

Players invited to that voice chat room will see a notification on their Nintendo Switch — but they won’t be able to simply join it by opening the smartphone app alone. Instead, they have to open the app and join the private match through the Splatoon 2 Online Lounge menu. It doesn’t matter if you’re starting or joining voice chat through the Nintendo Switch Online app, you’re going to be juggling your smartphone and your console.

To make the cumbersome experience worse, hosting voice through the smartphone app separates the game’s audio from the chat audio — which potentially creates a situation where a player is wearing multiple pairs of headphones or choosing between hearing the game and hearing their teammates in voice chat. Nintendo and manufacturers like HORI are creating headset accessories that merge the two audio sources together, but that adds yet a third device into the Nintendo Switch-voice juggling act.

There are limitations, too. If users switch to a different smartphone app, they’ll be temporarily removed from voice chat — making it impossible to check text messages without removing yourself from the conversation. The app also requires the screen to stay on at all times, which takes a significant toll on the phone’s battery life. Finally, the chat ends as soon as your multiplayer sessions is over. If you want to use the Nintendo Online app for cross game chat with friends playing other Switch games, you’re out of luck.

At least once everything’s set up the experience works pretty well. While in the lobby in between rounds of Splatoon 2, all players can chat amongst themselves — but when a match starts, each team is automatically sorted into private chat rooms. The voice quality isn’t bad either and seems on par with Skype or other VOIP programs on a smartphone. Unfortunately, it offers few advantages over just using one of those services instead.

It’s early for Nintendo’s voice chat solution — the only game that supports it isn’t even out yet, and the service itself has only been live for a few hours — but at first blush, it’s not off to a great start. The act of juggling menus between two different devices is cumbersome and frustrating, and the entire process isn’t intuitive to new users at all.

Relegating the chat functions to a separate device is a strange decision, too. Competing services like Xbox Live and PlayStation solved the puzzle of online multiplayer voice chat years ago. Nintendo seems to be reinventing the wheel for no reason.

It’s worth noting, however, that the Nintendo’s Switch Online services are technically in beta and won’t have a full feature launch until early 2018. With any luck, the company will iron out the kinks by then. For now, however, Nintendo’s solution for online voice chat is cumbersome, unintuitive and weird. Unfortunately, that’s classic Nintendo.

In this article: av, editorial, games, gaming, multiplayer, nintendo, splatnet, splatnet2,splatoon2, voicechat
[“Source-engadget”]

Software emissions fix for three million Mercedes diesels

Mercedes flags

Three million Mercedes-Benz owners in Europe will be offered a software fix for their diesel cars.

Daimler, which owns the luxury car maker, has been under intense pressure from police and prosecutors.

Authorities are investigating the possible manipulation of diesel exhaust emissions in passenger cars.

A Daimler spokesman said the software fix, which will cost about 220m euros (£195m), was not linked to the police investigation.

He said the “voluntary service measure” was to cut nitrogen oxide pollution.

“The service actions involve no costs for the customers. The implementation of the measures will be starting in the next weeks,” Daimler said.

The measures come after German MPs last week questioned Mercedes-Benz executives about emissions.

At the time the carmaker agreed with the transport ministry to undergo another round of emissions tests.

In May German police searched 11 offices of the carmaker as part of an investigation into possible fraudulent emissions data by employees.

A total of 23 prosecutors and 230 police officers took part in the search in the states of Baden-Wuerttemberg, Berlin, Lower Saxony and Saxony.

[“Source-bbc”]

Xiaomi Mi 5X Launch Set for July 26, Confirmed to Feature Dual Rear Cameras, MIUI 9

Xiaomi Mi 5X Launch Set for July 26, Confirmed to Feature Dual Rear Cameras, MIUI 9

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Xiaomi confirms Mi 5X will be launched on July 26
  • It will come with dual cameras with dual LED flash module
  • It’s expected to be priced around CNY 1,999 (roughly Rs. 19,000)

Xiaomi will launch the Mi 5X, another variant for its successful Mi 5 smartphone after the Xiaomi Mi 5c, on July 26. The smartphone was leaked earlier this week in a multitude of promotional images, revealing its design, features, and specifications in abundance. Now, the Xiaomi has confirmed that the Xiaomi Mi 5X will be unveiled at an event slated to be held in China. Besides, the smartphone will come with Android 7.0 Nougat-based MIUI 9, which was earlier confirmed by the company to be released before August 16.

The Xiaomi Mi 5X will be unveiled on July 26, according to a teaser posted by Xiaomi on its Weibo account. The teaser contains an image showing actor Kris Wu holding the device that has a dual rear camera setup along with a dual-LED flash module, and at the centre sits the fingerprint scanner. According to the previous leaks, the Xiaomi Mi 5X is alleged to sport a 5.5-inch full-HD (1080×1920 pixels) display. It is said to be powered by the Snapdragon 625 SoC paired with 4GB of RAM. On the design part, it is likely to ape the iPhone 7 Plus and come in Black, Gold, and Rose Gold colour options.

As we mentioned, the Xiaomi Mi 5X will launch with MIUI 9 out-of-the-box. The MIUI 9 is Xiaomi’s next mobile OS iteration that will come with a design overhaul and Android Nougat. Xiaomi recently enlisted the number of devices that will be getting MIUI 9, which is slated to arrive by August 16. Talking about the pricing, the Xiaomi Mi 5X is rumoured to cost around CNY 1,999 or roughly Rs. 19,000.

Xiaomi India on Tuesday launched the Mi Max 2 in India at a price of Rs. 16,999. The Xiaomi Mi Max 2 comes with a huge 6.44-inch full-HD (1080×1920 pixels) display, 5300mAh battery, and 4GB RAM, and is the successor of the Mi Max that was launched last year. The Mi Max 2’s rear camera sports a 12-megapixel Sony IMX386 sensor with PDAF and dual-LED flash. On the front, it sports a 5-megapixel camera. The inbuilt storage is expandable via microSD card (up to 128GB). Connectivity options include 4G VoLTE, dual-band Wi-Fi 802.11ac , GPS/ A-GPS, Bluetooth v4.2, infrared, a 3.5mm audio jack, and a USB Type-C port.

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]

Adobe launches redesigned Lightroom for Androi

Adobe launched an update for its Lightroom photo management and editing apps on iOS and Android today. The iOS app for iPhone and iPad is getting a few new features, including support for Adobe’s selective brush, a new details tab and an interface update for the iPad version. That’s all pretty nice, but the biggest news here is that Adobe also completely redesigned the Android app from the ground up.

Adobe has long been an iOS-first shop and, while it now offers most of its apps on Android, too, it often felt as if the teams spent far more time polishing the iOS apps than the Android versions. Lightroom on Android was always a pretty competent mobile version of the desktop experience, but it never felt all that snappy and native.

“We wanted to provide the best Android experience possible so we redesigned Lightroom for Android from the ground up to be faster, more efficient, and, well, more Android-y,” Adobe says in today’s announcement. “Every screen has been redesigned with the goal of ensuring a natural, native Android experience while providing the highest quality, professional-grade mobile photo editing app ever.”

Sadly, new features like Selective Brush, which complements the currently available linear and radial gradients, and the Detail tab that gives you global control over sharpening and noise, are still coming to iOS first. Chances are we’ll have to wait a little bit longer to get these on Android.

[Source:-techcrunch]

WhatsApp Update Brings Support for All File Types, Shared Media Bundling

WhatsApp Update Brings Support for All File Types, Shared Media Bundling

WhatsApp has been on a roll this year, adding feature upon feature to the world’s most popular messaging app to make it more appealing to the users. The company is continuing the streak, and has added support for all types of file transfers (including archives) as well as shared media bundling in the stable version of the Android app. These features had been under testing in WhatsApp beta for Android for some time now. However, users still continue to wait for the final release of the message recall feature that has been leaked several times already.

To use the new feature, WhatsApp users on Android can head to Google Play to download the latest version of the app. Apart from support for all file types and media bundling, the latest WhatsApp update also enables text formatting in the chat. When typing text in a chat window, users can now tap and hold to select the text to easily bold, strikethrough, or italicise. This feature was also available earlier to beta users.

WhatsApp media bundling

Several beta users last month also started receiving new shared media bundling feature. WhatsApp users will now be able to send a bunch of photos to their friends, who will receive them bundled as an album and not as before, one after another. With the new update, once a user opens an album, all images are shown on a single page. The feature also indicates that WhatsApp will give more room for shared photos. This WhatsApp feature was rolled out to iPhone users last month, and refines the sharing of multiple photos on the platform.

The new WhatsApp for Android update also brings minor change to the WhatsApp call screen where users will now have to swipe up instead of sideways to pick up a call. The revamped WhatsApp call screen was also spotted last month.

[“source-gadgets.ndtv”]

Google releases Backup and Sync for Mac and Windows

Google’s Backup and Sync desktop app is now available for download for Mac and Windows after a delay last month. Users now have the power to sync up anything, including photos and videos from cameras, SD cards, and USB devices, instead of their files remaining stuck in one place.

It’s a way to protect files and photos by backing them up, as long as they’re in Google Drive and Google Photos, primarily for consumer users. Business users of G Suite are recommended to keep using Google Drive until a business-focused solution called Drive File Stream comes out later this year. People can sign up for Drive File Stream’s early adopter program though.

Google wrote on its blog, “Just choose the folders you want to back up, and we’ll take care of the rest.” Backup and Sync is available through Google Drive and Google Photos for download.

[“Source-theverge”]

Microsoft 365 bundles Office and Windows together for businesses

Microsoft is announcing Microsoft 365 today, a new way for businesses to purchase Office and Windows together. While the software giant has sold Office 365 and Windows 10 to businesses in many different ways, Microsoft 365 Enterprise combines Office 365 Enterprise, Windows 10 Enterprise, and Microsoft’s Enterprise Mobility and Security features into a single subscription.

Microsoft is also offering Microsoft 365 Business, which will debut in public preview on August 2nd and includes Office 365 Business Premium alongside security and management features for Office apps and Windows 10 devices. Both bundles are being announced today Microsoft’s Inspire partner conference today, which hosts 17,000 attendees together to discuss Microsoft’s many partnerships.

Microsoft 365 Enterprise will be available for purchase on August 1st, with pricing dependent on the specific plan and “other factors.” Microsoft 365 Business will be available in public preview on August 2nd, with a full release set for later this fall. Microsoft 365 Business will cost $20 per user, per month.

Microsoft is also launching its Azure Stack today, allowing businesses to host their own hybrid cloud. Dell, HP, and Lenovo are all creating integrated systems to run Azure Stack and host apps and services on hardware that’s located alongside a business’ current infrastructure. The first systems will start shipping in September.

Today’s Microsoft Inspire conference will also see CEO Satya Nadella on stage to discuss the company’s work with partners, and its plans for the future as Microsoft shakes up its internal sales force. Microsoft is travelling to Washington DC this year with 17,000 attendees, and boasts of more cloud partners than AWS, Google, and Salesforce combined. Microsoft’s impressive cloud growth has already boosted the company’s revenue in recent years. As the software maker focuses more of its efforts on the cloud we’ll see more hints of the direction that Microsoft is heading in over the next year during Inspire this week.

[“Source-theverge”]

India, Israel Launch Technology Fund To Prepare For Digital Age

India, Israel Launch Technology Fund To Prepare For Digital Age

India will use the fund on research and development of digital assets to boost economic growth.
HIGHLIGHTS
Israel wants to expand deeply into India’s market of 1.3 billion people
India wants Israeli technology to move the country into the digital age
Trade between India and Israel has grown to $4.2 billion since 1992
Israel and India launched a technology fund today aimed at growing the countries’ business relationship, and signed seven accords boosting cooperation in areas ranging from space research to water and agriculture. The Israel India Innovation Initiative Fund, or I4F, was announced during an unprecedented visit to Israel by Prime Minister Narendra Modi, who is looking for military and other technologies as he seeks to move his country aggressively into the digital age. Israel, whose export-focused economy relies heavily on technology, is eager to penetrate India’s market of 1.3 billion citizens.

The two governments today announced a strategic partnership for water that focuses on conservation, agricultural use of treated wastewater, and on cleaning the Ganga and other rivers. The sides stressed the importance of defence collaboration and said future deals should include the transfer of Israeli technology, in line with PM Modi’s Make In India initiative. Three separate memorandums of understanding or MoUs were signed for space research.

“This is a great day,” Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said during a working lunch in Jerusalem, according to comments released by his office. “I have a feeling that today India and Israel are changing our world.”

Mr Netanyahu accepted PM Modi’s invitation to make a reciprocal visit to India, his office said.

Infinite market

The announcements follow a flurry of recent tie-ups. Indian Angel Network, the country’s largest angel investor group, said last week it was starting operations in Israel, and India’s biggest marketplace for start-up funding, LetsVenture, agreed last week to work with Israeli equity crowdfunding platform OurCrowd.

Wipro Limited entered a partnership with Tel Aviv University to research emerging technologies, and Israel Aerospace Industries Limited today announced one joint venture with Wipro Infrastructure Engineering and expanded another with Kalyani Group.

Trade between the countries has grown from $200 million in 1992, when they established diplomatic ties, to nearly $4.2 billion last year, according to figures from Israel’s Economy Ministry. Still, if defence items and diamonds are excluded, Israeli exports to India have fallen in recent years.

The I4F fund could help arrest that trend. Each government will put $4 million a year for five years into the fund, which aims to encourage Indians to invest in Israel’s technology ecosystem and spur large Indian companies to open development centres there.

“The fund is important,” said Avi Luvton, Israel Innovation Authority’s Senior Director for Asia Pacific. “It creates a tool through which connections are made.”

India is one of the world’s largest arms importers and is the biggest buyer of Israeli defence products, a relationship that Benjamin Grossman, Partner and Head of Indian legal practice at Tel Aviv-based APM and Company law firm, said can be expanded to the civilian sector. A recent report by Accenture and Nasscom said cross-border investments between Israel and India could produce as much as $25 billion in sales by 2025.

“It isn’t ‘copy-paste,’ but it can be done,” said Mr Grossman, who previously worked in Israel’s defence sector. “India is an almost infinite market for Israel.”
Indian evolution

Long a source of software programming talent, India’s technology industry is evolving beyond outsourcing as start-ups spring up to compete in ride-sharing, e-commerce, education and health. An alliance with Israel offers India a chance to learn from a country that has built a world-renowned innovation industry from the ground up.

Deepak Bagla, Chief Executive Officer of Invest India, the national investment promotion and facilitation agency, was in Israel last month to see what lessons from “Start-Up Nation” could strengthen India’s innovation infrastructure.

“We were impressed by how closely linked the entire ecosystem is,” Mr Bagla said, noting a network that enables ease of access across a start-up’s entire lifecycle, and government support through various financing programmes.

Beta site

A 2016 report by Nasscom-Zinnov found India lags in the number of incubators and accelerators, the time it takes to set up a new business, and on corporate tax rates.

“We can help one another,” Mr Luvton said. “It’s a giant step forward.”

The Israel-US Binational Industrial Research and Development Fund, the model for I4F, has invested in almost 1,000 projects since 1977. Its products have generated $10 billion in indirect and direct revenue for the two countries.

Israel can help India write a playbook for innovation, said Shanti Mohan, LetsVenture’s Chief Executive Officer. At the same time, India can serve as a beta site for Israeli technologies looking to scale up, especially in the agricultural and defence sectors, she said.

Indian investments in Israeli technologies are likely to grow. Amitra Farmahan, Country Business Head for wealth management company Reliance Private Client, said she has seen “extremely good response” since they started working with OurCrowd last month.

[“Source-ndtv”]