Google lets three enterprise cloud databases loose

Google lets three enterprise cloud databases loose

Google has made three new enterprise database offerings generally available, hoping to lure customers currently on Amazon Web Services and Microsoft’s Azure platforms over to its Compute Engine service.

The three offerings include the fully managed Cloud SQL Second Generation with MySQL instances, the Cloud Bigtable noSQL wide-column service with Apache HBase compability, and the Cloud Datastore, a scalable, NoSQL document database.

Pricing for Cloud SQL 2nd Generation starts at US$0.015 per hour for 0.6 gigabytes of memory, shared virtual processor, and maximum 3TB capacity for the smallest, db-f1-micro instance.

This goes up to US$2.012 per hour for the db-n-highmem-16 instance, with 16 VCPUs, 104GB of RAM and up to 10TB of storage. In addition, Google charges US$0.17 per GB and month for storage capacity, and US$0.08 per GB and month for backups.

Bigtable nodes cost US$0.65 per node and hour, with a minimum of three required per cluster. Each node can delivery up to 10,000 queries per second and 10 Mbps data transfers.

Storage for Bigtable on solid state disks is charged at US$0.17 per GB and month, with the hard drive equivalent service costing US$0.026 per GB and month. Australian customers pay US$0.19 per GB for up to 1TB of internet egress traffic, which drops to US$0.18/GB for 1 to 10TB, and US$0.15/GB for more than 10TB.

Cloud Datastore is free for up to 1GB of storage, 50,000/20,000/20,000 entity reads/writes/deletes, with additional charges once those limits are reached.

Customers wanting to run their own databases on the Google Compute Engine can now use Microsoft SQL Service images with built-in licenses. Business can also use their own, existing application licenses.

Google claimed that its Cloud SQL 2nd Gen database provides substantially better performance than Amazon’s RDS MSQL Multi-Availability Zone and RDS Aurora databases – up to 16 concurrent threads, as measured with the Sysbench benchmark.

Beyond 16 concurrent threads the AWS databases were slightly better than Cloud SQL 2nd Gen. In terms of transactions per second, Sysbench testing showed AWS Aurora to be the leader beyond 16 concurrent threads.

Some of the performance difference is due to design decisions for the databases: Google’s SQL 2nd Gen emphasises performance and allows for replication lag which can increase failover times albeit won’t put data at risk, Google said.

AWS Aurora, meanwhile, is designed with replication technology that exhibits minimal performance variation and consistent lag.

Google also said the Cloud SQL 2nd Gen replicated database had about half the end-to-end latency for single client threads compared to AWS RDS for MySQL Multi-Availability Zone, at 32.02ms – substantially better than the 70.12ms measured for AWS RDS Aurora.

Source:-.itnews.

Google lets three enterprise cloud databases loose

Google lets three enterprise cloud databases loose

Promises better performance than AWS.

Google has made three new enterprise database offerings generally available, hoping to lure customers currently on Amazon Web Services and Microsoft’s Azure platforms over to its Compute Engine service.

The three offerings include the fully managed Cloud SQL Second Generation with MySQL instances, the Cloud Bigtable noSQL wide-column service with Apache HBase compability, and the Cloud Datastore, a scalable, NoSQL document database.

Pricing for Cloud SQL 2nd Generation starts at US$0.015 per hour for 0.6 gigabytes of memory, shared virtual processor, and maximum 3TB capacity for the smallest, db-f1-micro instance.

This goes up to US$2.012 per hour for the db-n-highmem-16 instance, with 16 VCPUs, 104GB of RAM and up to 10TB of storage. In addition, Google charges US$0.17 per GB and month for storage capacity, and US$0.08 per GB and month for backups.

Bigtable nodes cost US$0.65 per node and hour, with a minimum of three required per cluster. Each node can delivery up to 10,000 queries per second and 10 Mbps data transfers.

Storage for Bigtable on solid state disks is charged at US$0.17 per GB and month, with the hard drive equivalent service costing US$0.026 per GB and month. Australian customers pay US$0.19 per GB for up to 1TB of internet egress traffic, which drops to US$0.18/GB for 1 to 10TB, and US$0.15/GB for more than 10TB.

Cloud Datastore is free for up to 1GB of storage, 50,000/20,000/20,000 entity reads/writes/deletes, with additional charges once those limits are reached.

Customers wanting to run their own databases on the Google Compute Engine can now use Microsoft SQL Service images with built-in licenses. Business can also use their own, existing application licenses.

Google claimed that its Cloud SQL 2nd Gen database provides substantially better performance than Amazon’s RDS MSQL Multi-Availability Zone and RDS Aurora databases – up to 16 concurrent threads, as measured with the Sysbench benchmark.

Beyond 16 concurrent threads the AWS databases were slightly better than Cloud SQL 2nd Gen. In terms of transactions per second, Sysbench testing showed AWS Aurora to be the leader beyond 16 concurrent threads.

Some of the performance difference is due to design decisions for the databases: Google’s SQL 2nd Gen emphasises performance and allows for replication lag which can increase failover times albeit won’t put data at risk, Google said.

AWS Aurora, meanwhile, is designed with replication technology that exhibits minimal performance variation and consistent lag.

Google also said the Cloud SQL 2nd Gen replicated database had about half the end-to-end latency for single client threads compared to AWS RDS for MySQL Multi-Availability Zone, at 32.02ms – substantially better than the 70.12ms measured for AWS RDS Aurora.

[“Source-itnews”]

GarageBand update lets artists publish directly to Apple Music Connect

Apple on Tuesday announced updates to its consumer music author app,GarageBand. One of the new features ties directly to the release of Apple Music: Artists on Apple Music Connect can publish directly to the service from GarageBand.

Apple Music Connect was unveiled on Tuesday as part of the Apple Music service. It’s a social aspect that gives artist a venue for interacting with fans.

Apple Music Connect artists can, say, create a sample of a melody that they just thought of and make it available on Connect to get feedback from fans. Or an artist can offer previews of new singles that are about to drop. It’s another way for artists to cultivate a community on Apple Music.

At this time, Apple Music Connect artists will need to use the iOS version of GarageBand in order to directly upload content to their account. An Apple representative said that Mac support is forthcoming.

Why this matters: Differentiating Apple Music from other streaming services such as Spotify, Pandora, and Rdio is important to Apple. Connect is a social service that the others don’t have, and the ability of artists to upload songs from GarageBand cuts out the middleman, giving fans a sense of direct access. Fans also benefit by getting content that may not be found in any other streaming service. It’s another feature that Apple can tout over its competitors.

New features for EDM and hip-hop

The new GarageBand 10.1 also has features geared towards musicians of electronic dance music (EDM) and hip-hop. These features come as a result of Apple’s acquisition earlier this year of Camel Audio, makers of the Alchemy a software sample synthesizer. They’ve been previewed on Apple’s GarageBand website prior to Tuesday, but they are now officially available.

Version 10.1 includes an update to GarageBand’s Drummer feature, which offers simple controls that allow you to create realistic performances with a few simple control adjustments. The update has ten new drummers, all with electronic music in mind, including Boom Bap Hip Hop, Dubstep, EDM, and Retro 80s.

GarageBand also has 100 new EDM and hip-hop synth patches and a new Transform Pad Smart Control. The Transform Pad allows for customization of synths by clicking and/or dragging on a grid of controls that modify the sound. You can also record the performances of any of the software’s Smart Controls.

Apple’s GarageBand website offers samples and demos of the new Drummer and Transform Pad features, so you can see for yourself how they work.

Other new GarageBand features include support for Force Touch gestures and feedback, and a thousand new Apple Loops.

The 10.1 update is free to owners of version 10. The app is also available in the App Store for $5.

 
[Source:- Macworld]