Have you had bad experiences with Microsoft’s Windows 10 Mobile tech support?

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Companies today find it difficult to score the right balance when it comes to customer support. Microsoft is no exception, and we want to hear about your experiences with the company related to mobile product support, good or bad. Community member 73blazer experienced an issue with Windows 10 Mobile and the official Mail app from Microsoft. After updating it to the latest version, it ceased to work in Continuum mode.

As expected, 73blazer decided to hit up Microsoft for some assistance. What wasn’t expected was the bad experience. First off, Microsoft Office support was involved, and they were unable to offer assistance and eventually redirected our poor member over to B2x, an outsourced support platform Microsoft uses for hardware and other support. After providing the IMEI number of an HP Elite X3, 73blazer was informed that only Lumia phones are covered for support through this particular channel.

Do they even have it? I tried desperately Friday to get some insight into an issue that is clearly a bug, to no avail. Basically, the issue is the new version of the mail app that came out earlier this week, won’t launch in continuum mode. Elite x3 had it. I pull out my 950xl which hadn’t updated in a while mail launches there in continuum mode, update the mail app, mail won’t launch in…

REPLY

After supplying the same information for a Lumia 950, both soft and hard resets were recommended (clearly we’re looking at someone reading from a list of instructions to hand to consumers). It got worse from there, and so our forum member contacted HP support. They were more helpful and offered to take the problem up with Microsoft directly, supplying 73blazer with a case number to reference.How have your past experiences gone down when you got in touch with Microsoft for support? Do you have any tips when it comes to Windows 10 Mobile and specifically Lumia devices? Hit the link below and sound off in our community forum.

[“Source-windowscentral”]

Tim Sweeney is positively steam-ed about Microsoft’s Windows Cloud operating system

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Yesterday, we reported on Windows Cloud — a new version of Microsoft’s Windows 10 that’s supposedly in the works. Windows Cloud would be limited to applications that are available through the Windows Store and is widely believed to be a play for the education market, where Chromebooks are currently popular.

Tim Sweeney, the founder of Epic and lead developer on the Unreal Engine, has been a harsh critic of Microsoft and its Windows Store before. He wasted no time launching a blistering tirade against this new variant of the operating system, before Microsoft has even had a chance to launch the thing.

With all respect to Tim, I think he’s wrong on this for several reasons. First, the idea that the Windows Store is going to crush Steam is simply farcical. There is no way for Microsoft to simply disallow Steam or other applications from running in mainstream Windows without completely breaking Win32 compatibility in its own operating system. Smartphone manufacturers were able to introduce the concept of app stores and walled gardens early on. Fortune 500 companies, gamers, enthusiasts, and computer users in general would never accept an OS that refused to run Win32 applications.

The second reason the Windows Store is never going to crush Steam is that the Windows Store is, generally speaking, a wasteland where software goes to die. The mainstream games that have debuted on that platform have generally been poor deals compared with what’s available on other platforms (like Steam). There’s little sign Microsoft is going to change this anytime soon, and until it does, Steam’s near-monopoly on PC game distribution is safe.

Third, if Microsoft is positioning this as a play against Chrome OS, Windows Cloud isn’t going to debut on high-end systems that are gaming-capable in the first place. This is a play aimed at low-end ARM or x86 machines with minimum graphics and CPU performance. In that space, a locked-down system is a more secure system. That’s a feature, not a bug, if your goal is to build systems that won’t need constant IT service from trojans, malware, and bugs.

Like Sweeney, I value the openness and capability of the PC ecosystem — but I also recognize that there are environments and situations where that openness is a risk with substantial downside and little benefit. Specialized educational systems for low-end markets are not a beachhead aimed at destroying Steam. They’re a rear-guard action aimed at protecting Microsoft’s educational market share from an encroaching Google.

 

 

[Source:- Extremetech]

Microsoft’s latest Windows update breaks multi-monitor gaming

SeriousSam

We’ve been talking about the problem of forced non-security updates since Windows 10 launched, so I won’t belabor the point again here. Instead, I’d like to point out that the issue here isn’t even just a question of forcing an update — it’s about forcing updates that break existing system configurations. If you’ve used Microsoft Windows for any length of time, you’re aware that the OS has its own built-in mechanisms for determining which software and hardware are already installed in your machine. Try to install a Windows Update that’s already been installed, and the computer informs you of that fact. Try to install an application, and you get a similar message. If you try to install old graphics drivers on top of newer drivers and you’ll get an error message. Windows is required to know how many displays you have connected to it, or it wouldn’t be able to offer color profile management or an appropriately scaled desktop. Similarly, the OS has to remember which windows belong on which screens to display information appropriately and it has information on what kind of GPU is installed.

There is, in other words, no reason why Microsoft should be pushing this update as mandatory for people who game on multiple displays. In fact, given the company’s 18-month fetish for telemetry collection, there’s no reason why Redmond couldn’t notifygamers that they may not be able to play certain titles without using workarounds to do so. This hits one of the most annoying points of these so-called “service” models — despite calling it a “service,” the service doesn’t actually serve the end customer. If Microsoft wanted to get end-users onboard with its telemetry collection, it could start by using that data in ways that actually improve their customer experience.

But since Microsoft doesn’t do that, if you’re a widescreen gamer, your choices are to disable Windows Update altogether or to hope this update doesn’t impact any titles you like playing in that configuration. There aren’t many people playing games on more than one monitor, to be sure, but this kind of regression is why people don’t like mandatory updates in the first place. We’ve seen some signs of late that MS is bending a bit on this issue by giving people the ability to defer updates by 35 days once the Creators Update (Redstone 2) drops later this year. Hopefully that’s just the first step back towards a more sane update policy.

 

[Source:- Extremetech]

 

Now we know what Microsoft’s upcoming ‘Game Mode’ for Windows 10 will do

Windows 10 Game Mode

A few weeks ago, sharp-eyed users spotted something new in a Windows 10 Insider Preview build — reference to a new “Game Mode.” Discussions on what the feature might do, or how it could improve performance, have made the rounds since. But a new investigation suggests the new feature won’t make much difference for the vast majority of Windows 10 gamers.

PCGamesN has details on the latest Insider Preview build (15007) and what it exposes in the OS. While Game Mode can’t be enabled yet, you can read the description of what it’s going to do. Basically, it performs some low-level services tailoring to make the system work smarter when you’re actively using Microsoft’s GameDVR function.

This is more-or-less as expected, and fairly worthless in any case. Both Nvidia and AMD have shipped software solutions with their own, low-level DVR capture capability, with a minimum impact on their own hardware. Microsoft’s decision to bake in its own solution is probably a boon to Intel gamers or to people who aren’t aware of Radeon ReLive or Nvidia ShadowPlay, but it’s not much benefit to anyone else. If you want to get back the performance improvement of Game Mode before Microsoft ships the feature, you can disable the DVR altogether using these instructions.

As for the amount of performance you’ll get back by making these changes, it’s unlikely you’d ever notice. Heck, it’s not even likely that you’d notice if you benchmarked the game. Barring an unusual situation, DVR recording and other background Windows services are meant to run in the background, where they’re unlikely to consume resources or cause issues. Part of the reason why this simply doesn’t matter on modern hardware is because Windows’ hardware specifications have only changed slightly since the introduction of Windows Vista in 2006. (The idea of running Vista on hardware from 1995 would’ve been beyond hilarious, but you can run Windows 10 on equipment sold 11 years ago, if you have to). Microsoft hasn’t done much moving of the goalposts, and later versions of Windows are generally viewed as improvements to Vista, as far as running on low-end hardware.

Don’t get us wrong — if Microsoft is enabling this feature because it has data suggesting that its DVR software doesn’t play nice with specific titles, that’s a fine thing. But we’d prefer the company just say that, as opposed to pushing the idea of a Game Mode that’s going to make most titles run faster. If you’re trying to play modern games on a computer that was cutting-edge in 2008 and hasn’t been upgraded since, DVR support is the least of your worries. If that doesn’t describe you, then these optimizations aren’t likely to matter.

What we would like to see, if Microsoft is taking notes, is a Game Mode that prevented Windows Update from rebooting the computer while resource-intensive applications or games are running. If you’ve ever had a Windows 10 system suddenly decide it’s time for a reboot in the middle of a game or benchmark run (and I’ve seen multiple testbeds pull this trick with zero warning), you know how infuriating it can be. Fix that problem, and you’ve got a Game Mode worth deploying.

[Source:- Extremetech]

Bing Predicts missed badly on the U.S. elections, and here’s Microsoft’s response

Image result for Bing Predicts missed badly on the U.S. elections, and here’s Microsoft’s response

As most of the world knows by now, Republican nominee Donald Trump won the Presidential Elections of 2016 this morning against Democratic Hillary Clinton. The sudden sweep of red states was an unexpected game changer in the election and almost everybody missed the mark, even Bing.

Bing Predicts is known for calculating the outcomes of popular global events such as sports championships, entertainment awards, and legislative elections. In this particular case, Bing saw fit to grant Clinton the win with a comfortable margin. We even saw Bing Predicts give as high as 90% probability in the lady’s favor. But as the night went on, it dwindled to leave Trump with the majority of electoral votes and the presidency on the horizon.

WinBeta reached out to Microsoft for an answer to exactly how Bing was so far off the outcome. A spokesperson replied:

“Bing Predicts uses several sources including search, web, social data, third-parties and more to inform predictions. True to the nature of all predictions, we can never guarantee 100% accuracy.”

Bing wasn’t the only prediction to guess wrongly. In fact, most major news and analysist predictions were shocked to see just how wrong they were when the results came in from yesterday’s polls.

What does this mean for Bing Predicts? Probably nothing. Simply put, the system can only calculate with data that it is given like we explained here. After all, computers are only as intelligent as mankind creates them to be.

 

 

[Source:- Winbeta]

Watch Apple advertise Microsoft’s Surface Pro

Over the weekend, Apple released a new ad campaign for the iPad Pro. Perhaps directed at Windows users, the ad shows off iPad Pro features not available on traditional computers, and questions viewers by asking,”what’s a computer?”

Of course, this ad will not settle well with some Windows and Microsoft fans, so one Reddit user switched things up and created a video of Apple advertising Microsoft’s Surface Pro.

Seen above, Reddit user hisensemusic, overlaid the voice over from Apple’s original adwith clips from Microsoft’s ads for the Surface Pro 4. The user notes that the video was made in around 30 minutes, and that it is, “amazing how well the Surface commercial just slots in to the voice over.”

Amazing it is indeed, because right the Apple narration mentions “Keyboard that can just out of the way,” images of Microsoft’s Surface Pro 4 Type Cover appear on the screen. Similarly, when the Apple narration taunts, “and a screen you can touch and write on” images of the Surface Pen, and the Surface Pro 4’s touch screen display appear on the screen.

So, what do you think of this video? Let us know your thoughts and reflections by dropping us a comment below!

 

[Source: Winbeta]

Microsoft’s app strategy is finally heading in the right direction

Microsoft’s app strategy has been picking up steam recently. The latest development came at Facebook’s F8 conference, which was held this week, and will allow developers to build apps for Windows with greater ease.

Up until last week, the strategy could have been described as a shambles and had created problems for Microsoft right across the board. The biggest one, or at least the one that has gotten the most attention, was Windows Phone — now Windows 10 Mobile — which struggled to get popular apps, like Snapchat, onto the platform.

Versions of Windows Phone barely had any popular apps, like Instagram, which lead to a community that regularly had to rely on third-party alternatives, which were usually developed on a shoe-string budget. These apps, while good, would often get shut down or the developer would run out of money.

It’s unfair to say that Windows Phone failed entirely because of this problem, but it was definitely a contributory factor. People tried all three operating systems — Windows, iOS, and Android — but found that only two had the apps they wanted (or needed, in some cases).

The app problem lead to a sales problem which, in turn, lead to the problem of fewer apps. No developer, especially an indie developer, was going to spend time making an app for a platform that had, at times, less than 2% global marketshare and, thanks to low-end phones, users that were less likely to spend money than iOS.

Microsoft evidently thought long and hard about this problem and came up with a solution: One app for all platforms. These platforms include PC, Xbox (which, naturally, brings in big-name games), Internet of Things devices, and phones. Now, developers have a different choice: Instead of having to build a separate app for Windows phones, they just build one for Windows 10.

This was, and still is, a big boost for Microsoft’s phones and offers something that no other platform can offer developers. While Apple has been working on building phone features into the desktop — things like Launchpad, for example — it has never presented a unified app strategy, much to the annoyance of developers.

Google, too, has never worked that hard at letting Android apps work on Chrome OS and, besides, the operating system has never been as popular as Windows (or OS X), except in schools, which mainly rely on the browser or a word processor.

Microsoft had, in one move, created a unique selling point for its platform, which it calls the Universal Windows Platform, and has been rolling with it ever since.

However, it’s still unclear if the strategy will work, but there are signs that it could be. The latest one, as I said, coming from Facebook.

Essentially, what Facebook has done is expand its set of tools, which it calls React Native, to Windows 10. This means that over 250,000 developers will now be able to easily port apps to Windows 10 which, thanks to the Universal Windows Platform, means that PCs, the Xbox, Windows phones, and even your IoT-powered fridge can benefit from them.

This coincides with a big push from other developers, like Uber, into the Windows world. While there are few people who would choose Windows because of Uber, it does demonstrate the advantage that a universal platform brings Microsoft. The app works on your desktop, which is perfect for ordering a taxi from your home, just as well as it works from a phone.

As I have argued before, Microsoft’s best chance of making something out of Windows 10 Mobile, and its assorted devices, would be to focus on its enterprise customers, pitching it as a cheaper (and easier) alternative to managing iPhones and Android phones from a system administrators point of view.

Thanks to UWP, Microsoft can get all of the apps it needs — boosted, in part, by the high adoption rate of Windows 10 — and then pitch phone customers off the back of that.

This strategy is very long tail — businesses tend to adopt technologies at a far slower pace than consumers — but it may eventually be a big bonus for Windows, and Microsoft, as developers start building apps for the platform.

The support for Facebook, which was initially sceptical about Windows, is an especially big deal. According to an analysis of user’s habits, people initially download many apps but then only use about five regularly and one of those is Facebook. (Others, like Snapchat, are not available on Windows phones.)

The developers behind The New York TimesThe Wall Street Journal, Netflix, Shazam, and more, are all bringing apps out on Windows 10, which are then available on Windows phones, and can be used to attract users.

Beyond this, Microsoft has also been working on making apps that are currently available on iOS and Android available on Windows. Xamarin, the company Microsoft bought earlier this year, offers developers the ability to build cross-platform apps and the company announced at Build that its software is now open source.

The “bridge” projects have also been moving forward — except the Android version — and could lead to more developers bringing iPhone-ready apps to Windows, although it’s not yet clear how successful this plan will be.

All in all, it seems like one of Microsoft’s biggest problems — a lack of apps on Windows, across all device classes — may be slowly coming to an end. The excitement around Windows 10, which now has almost 300 million users, is palpable and Microsoft has never been in a better position, both strategically and directionally, to realise its objectives.

 

[Source:- Winbeta]

Microsoft’s Skype UWP app is a big improvement over the Messaging app

 

 

Microsoft is currently working on a new Universal Windows App of Skype for Windows 10, which is set to replace the awful Messaging and Skype Video apps already available on Windows 10 today. WinBeta has had some hands on time with an unfinished version of the app, as so far we’re impressed.

The new UWP app for Skype is a huge improvement over the hilariously bad Messaging app we use currently. The new Skype app actually looks like Skype for starters, and has all the bells and whistles you would expect a Skype client to have, like an emoji-library, group conversations, file sharing, and more.

The new app has the option to sync Skype contacts with the People app, and right-click context menus that offer access to Skype profiles and other options. Since this is an early build of the new Skype app, it’s almost certain that more Skype features will be ported over from the desktop app in good time. But right now, the new Skype app is a very nice improvement over the current Messaging app, which we all know is pretty damn bad.

[Source:- Winbeta]