Researchers from the UGR develop a new software which adapts medical technology to see the interior of a sculpture

Researchers from the UGR develop a new software which adapts medical technology to see the interior of a sculpture

A student at the University of Granada (UGR) has designed software that adapts current medical technology to analyze the interior of sculptures. It’s a tool to see the interior without damaging wood carvings, and it has been designed for the restoration and conservation of the sculptural heritage.

Francisco Javier Melero, professor of Languages and Computer Systems at the University of Granada and director of the project, says that the new software simplifies medical technology and adapts it to the needs of restorers working with wood carvings.

The software, called 3DCurator, has a specialized viewfinder that uses computed tomography in the field of restoration and conservation of sculptural heritage. It adapts the medical CT to restoration and it displays the 3-D image of the carving with which it is going to work.

Replacing the traditional X-rays for this system allows restorers to examine the interior of a statue without the problem of overlapping information presented by older techniques, and reveals its internal structure, the age of the wood from which it was made, and possible additions.

“The software that carries out this task has been simplified in order to allow any restorer to easily use it. You can even customize some functions, and it allows the restorers to use the latest medical technology used to study pathologies and apply it to constructive techniques of wood sculptures,” says professor Melero.

 

This system, which can be downloaded for free from www.3dcurator.es, visualizes the hidden information of a carving, verifies if it contains metallic elements, identifies problems of xylophages like termites and the tunnel they make, and detects new plasters or polychrome paintings added later, especially on the original finishes.

The main developer of 3DCurator was Francisco Javier Bolívar, who stressed that the tool will mean a notable breakthrough in the field of conservation and restoration of cultural assets and the analysis of works of art by experts in Art History.

Professor Melero explains that this new tool has already been used to examine two sculptures owned by the University of Granada: the statues of San Juan Evangelista, from the 16th century, and an Immaculate from the 17th century, which can be virtually examined at the Virtual Heritage Site Of the Andalusian Universities (patrimonio3d.ugr.es/).

 

 

[Source:- Phys.org]

 

New framework uses Kubernetes to deliver serverless app architecture

New framework uses Kubernetes to deliver serverless app architecture

A new framework built atop Kubernetes is the latest project to offer serverless or AWS Lambda-style application architecture on your own hardware or in a Kubernetes-as-a-service offering.

The Fission framework keeps the details about Docker and Kubernetes away from developers, allowing them to concentrate on the software rather than the infrastructure. It’s another example of Kubernetes becoming a foundational technology.

Some assembly, but little container knowledge, required

Written in Go and created by managed-infrastructure provider Platform9, Fission works in conjunction with any Kubernetes cluster. Developers write functions that use Fission’s API, much the same as they would for AWS Lambda. Each function runs in what’s called an environment, essentially a package for the language runtime. Triggers are used to map functions to events; HTTP routes are one common trigger.

Fission lets users effortlessly leverage Kubernetes and Docker to run applications on it. Developers don’t need to know intimate details about Docker or Kubernetes simply to ensure the application can run well. Likewise, developers don’t have to build app containers, but they can always use a prebuilt container if needed, especially if the app is larger and more complex than a single function can encapsulate.

Fission’s design allows applications to be highly responsive to triggers. When launched, Fission creates a pool of “prewarmed” containers ready to receive functions. According to Fission’s developers, this means an average of 100 milliseconds for the “cold start” of an application, although that figure will likely be dependent on the deployment and the hardware.

We’re just getting warmed up!

A few good clues indicate what Fission’s developers want to do with the project in the future. For one, the plan includes being as language- and runtime-agnostic as possible. Right now the only environments (read: runtimes) that ship with Fission are for Node.js and Python, but new ones can be added as needed, and existing ones can be modified freely. “An environment is essentially just a container with a web server and dynamic loader,” explains Fission’s documentation.

Another currently underdeveloped area that will be expanded in future releases: The variety of triggers available to Fission. Right now, HTTP routes are the only trigger type that can be used, but plans are on the table to add other triggers, such as Kubernetes events.

 

 

[Source:- Javaworld]

New JVM language stands apart from Scala, Clojure

New JVM language stands apart from Scala, Clojure

Another JVM language, Haskell dialect Eta, has arrived on the scene, again centering on functional programming.

Intended for building scalable systems, Eta is a strongly typed functional language. It’s similar to Scala, a JVM language that also emphasizes functional programming and scalability, and Clojure, another a functional language on the JVM.

But Eta sets itself apart from such competitors because it’s immutable by default, it uses lazy evaluation, and it has a very powerful type system, said Eta founder Rahul Muttineni, CTO at TypeLead, which oversees the language. This combination allows static guarantees and conciseness simply not possible in Scala or Clojure.

Currently at version 0.0.5 in an alpha release, Eta is interoperable with Java, allowing reuse of Java libraries in Eta projects and use of Eta modules in Java. Strong type safety enables developers to tell the compiler more information about code, while immutability in Eta boosts concurrency.

Eta also features purity, in which calling a function with the same arguments yields the same results each time; function definitions are treated as equations and substitutions can be performed like in math. Eta proponents said this makes it easier to understand code and prevents a lot of bugs typical in imperative languages. “Purity allows you to treat your code like equations in mathematics and makes it a lot easier to reason about your code, especially in concurrency and parallelism settings,” Muttineni said.

Eta is “lazy by default,” meaning data stays in an unevaluated state until a function needs to see inside. This lets developers program without having to be concerned about whether they have done more computation than was required. Developers also can write multipass algorithms in a single pass. “Laziness allows you to stop worrying about the order in which you write your statements,” said Muttineni. “Just specify the data dependencies by defining expressions and their relationships to each other, and the compiler will execute them in the right order and only if the expressions are needed.”

Plans call for fitting Eta with a concurrent runtime, an interactive REPL, metaprogramming, massive parallelism, and transactional concurrency. Support for the Maven build manager and a core library are in development as well, along with boilerplate generation for Java Foreign Function Interface imports.

 

 

[Source:- Javaworld]

Developers pick up new Git code-hosting option

Developers pick up new Git code-hosting option

Developers are gaining another option for Git code-hosting with Gitea, a lightweight, self-hosted platform.

Offered as open source under an MIT license, Gitea aims to be the easiest, fastest, and most painless way of setting up a self-hosted Git service, the project’s GitHub repo states. A community-managed fork of Gogs, for hosting a Git service, Gitea was written in Go and can be compiled for Windows, Linux, and MacOS. It will run on Intel, AMD, PowerPC, and ARM processors.

Gitea offers a solution for private repos, Rémy Boulanouar, a maintainer of Gitea, said. “For my own usage, I have dozens of project stored in Git in my personal laptop. I don’t want to share them with everybody and don’t want to pay to have private repositories of GitHub,” he said. “I used BitBucket a while ago to have [a] free private repository, but since I have a personal server at home, I wanted to store everything on it. Gitea is the perfect match for me: free, fast, and small.”

Proponents bill Gitea as easy to install, with users either able to run the binary or ship Gitea with Docker or Vagrant to package it. Gitea went to a 1.0.0 release in late December. “I wanted to have a GitHub-like [platform] in my own server but didn’t wanted to install the huge GitLab,” Boulanouar said. “I found Gogs during my search and wanted to make it really close to GitHub. I saw some missing feature and learned Go just for that.”

 

 

[Source:- Javaworld]

Safer, less vulnerable software is the goal of new computer publication

We can create software with 100 times fewer vulnerabilities than we do today, according to computer scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). To get there, they recommend that coders adopt the approaches they have compiled in a new publication.

The 60-page document, NIST Interagency Report (NISTIR) 8151: Dramatically Reducing Software Vulnerabilities (link is external), is a collection of the newest strategies gathered from across industry and other sources for reducing bugs in software. While the report is officially a response to a request for methods from the White House’s Office of Science and Technology Policy, NIST computer scientist Paul E. Black says its contents will help any organization that seeks to author high-quality, low-defect computer code.

“We want coders to know about it,” said Black, one of the publication’s coauthors. “We concentrated on including novel ideas that they may not have heard about already.”

Black and his NIST colleagues compiled these ideas while working with software assurance experts from many private companies in the computer industry as well as several government agencies that generate a good deal of code, including the Department of Defense and NASA. The resulting document reflects their cumulative input and experience.

Vulnerabilities are common in software. Even small applications have hundreds of bugs (link is external) by some estimates. Lowering these numbers would bring many advantages, such as reducing the number of computer crashes and reboots users need to deal with, not to mention decreasing the number of patch updates they need to download.

The heart of the document, Black said, is five sets of approaches, tools and concepts that can help, all of which can be found in the document’s second section. The approaches are organized under five subheadings that, despite their jargon-heavy titles, each possess a common-sense idea as an overarching principle (see downloadable infographic).

These approaches include: using math-based tools to verify the code will work properly; breaking up a computer’s programs into modular parts so that if one part fails, the whole program doesn’t crash; connecting analysis tools for code that currently operate in isolation; using appropriate programming languages for the task that the code attempts to carry out; and developing evolving and changing tactics for protecting code that is the target of cyberattacks.

In addition to the techniques themselves, the publication offers recommendations for how the programming community can educate itself about where and how to use them. It also suggests that customers should request the techniques be used in development. “You as a consumer should be able to write it into a contract that you want a vendor to develop software in accordance with these principles, so that it’s as secure as it can be,” Black said.

Security is, of course, a major concern for almost everyone who uses technology these days, and Black said that the White House’s original request for these approaches was part of its 2016 Federal Cybersecurity R&D Strategic Action Plan, intended to be implemented over the next three to seven years. But though ideas of security permeate the document, Black said the strategies have an even broader intent.

“Security tends to bubble to the surface because we’ve got adversaries who want to exploit weaknesses,” he said, “but we’d still want to avoid bugs even without this threat. The effort to stymie them brings up general principles. You’ll notice the title doesn’t have the word ‘security’ in it anywhere.”

 

[Source:- SD]

Wrists-on with Garmin’s new fenix 5 lineup at CES 2017

If you’re a serious athlete that’s been looking for a powerful multisport fitness watch, odds are you’ve stumbled across Garmin’s fēnix line of devices. While they are quite pricey, the fēnix 3 line has proven to be one of the most powerful multisport watches on the market.

At CES 2017, Garmin has unveiled three new entries to its fēnix lineup, the fēnix 5, fēnix 5S and fēnix 5X.

As the names might suggest, all three of these new devices are in the same family, so they all sport most of the same features. There are a few big differentiators between the three, though. The fēnix 5S, for instance, is a lighter, sleeker and smaller version of the standard fēnix 5. The fēnix 5 is the standard model, sporting all the same features as the 5S in a bigger form factor. The 5X is the highest-end device in the bunch, complete with preloaded wrist-based mapping.

The fēnix 5 is the standard model of the group. Measuring 47mm, it’s more compact than previous models like the fēnix 3HR, but still packs all the multisport features you’d come to expect from the series.

Garmin says the fēnix 5S is the first watch in the line designed specifically for female adventurers. Measuring just 42mm, the 5S is small and comfortable for petite wrists, without compromising any multisport features. It’s available in silver with either a white, turquoise or black silicone band color options with a mineral glass lens.

There’s also a fēnix 5S Sapphire model with a scratch-resistant sapphire lens that’s available in black with a black band, champagne with a water-resistant gray suede band, or champagne with a metal band. This model also comes with an extra silicone QuickFit band.

fenix 5X

The higher-end fēnix 5X measures 51mm and comes preloaded with TOPO US mapping, routable cycling maps and other navigation features like Round Trip Run and Round Trip Ride. With these new features, users can enter how far they’d like to run or ride, and their watch will suggest appropriate courses to choose from. The 5X will also display easy-to-read guidance cues for upcoming turns, allowing users to be aware of their route.

In addition, the 5X can use Around Me map mode to see different points of interest and other map objects within the user’s range to help users be more aware of their surroundings. This model will be available with a scratch-resistant sapphire lens.

 

[Source:- Androidauthority]

 

New Mac Pro release date rumours UK | Mac Pro 2016 tech specs: Kaby Lake processors expected at March 2017 Mac Pro update

When will Apple release a new Mac Pro? And what new features, specs and design changes should we expect when Apple updates the Mac Pro line for 2016? Is there any chance Apple will discontinue the Mac Pro instead of updating it?

Apple’s Mac Pro line-up could do with an update. The current Mac Pro model was announced at WWDC in June 2013 and, for a top-of-the range system, the Mac Pro is looking pretty long in the tooth. But when will Apple announce a new Mac Pro? And what hardware improvements, design changes, tech specs and new features will we see in the new Mac Pro for 2016? (Or 2017, or…)

There’s some good news for expectant Mac Pro fans: code in Mac OS X El Capitanhints that a new Mac Pro (one with 10 USB 3 ports) could arrive soon. But nothing is certain at this point, and some pundits believe the Mac Pro should simply be discontinued.

Whatever the future holds for the Mac Pro, in this article we will be looking at all the rumours surrounding the next update of the Mac Pro line: the new Mac Pro’s UK release date and pricing, its expected design, and the new features and specs we hope to see in the next version of the Mac Pro.

Updated on 6 December 2016 to discuss the chances of a new Mac Pro appearing in March; and on 15 November with updated processor rumours

For more discussion of upcoming Apple launches, take a look at our New iMac rumours and our big roundup of Apple predictions for 2017. And if you’re considering buying one of the current Mac Pro models, read Where to buy Mac Pro in the UK and our Mac buying guide.

 

 


[Source:- Macworld]

New MacBook Pro 2016 release date, UK price and tech specs | Complete guide to new MacBook Pro: MacBook Pro to get more RAM, Kaby Lake chips and price cut in 2017?

Image result for New MacBook Pro 2016 release date, UK price and tech specs | Complete guide to new MacBook Pro: MacBook Pro to get more RAM, Kaby Lake chips and price cut in 2017?

CONTENTS

  • New MacBook Pro announced!
  • Design
  • New features
  • Tech specs and performance
  • UK release date
  • UK prices
  • Macworld podcast – Apple’s 27 Oct launch event
  • MacBook Pro 2017
  • Read the event live blog

What are the prices, tech specs and new features of the new MacBook Pro 2016? And for that matter, when will the new MacBook Pro 2017 be released in the UK?

Welcome to our complete UK guide to the new MacBook Pro 2016, in which we cover everything you need to know about Apple’s new MacBook Pro models: UK prices and best deals, where to buy, new features, tech specs and performance stats. You can read more here: New MacBook Pro 2016 review.

But we’re not standing still now that 2016’s new MacBook Pro has been launched, and we’re already looking ahead to the next update. Later in this article we round up and analyse all the rumours related to the new MacBook Pro 2017 – its release date, specs, design, likely pricing and new features.

Updated, 30 November 2016, to expand our thoughts on the spec bump and price cut we expect the MacBook Pro to get in 2017.

New MacBook Pro 2016 release date, UK price and tech specs: New MacBook Pro announced!

Apple announced a long awaited update to its MacBook Pro laptops at an event in San Francisco on 27 October. The laptops, both 13in and 15in, feature USB-C ports and a Retina display, multi-touch Touch Bar, a versatile strip display that replaces the escape, function keys and power keys of a regular qwerty keyboard. We’ll look at all these in more detail in this article.

On 2 November, Phil Schiller (senior VP of marketing at Apple) was interviewed by The Independent and revealed the company’s plans and reaction to the MacBook Pro’s announcement. A key point raised in the interview is that Mac and iOS devices will always be separate from one another: the California-based company won’t try to integrate the two. Schiller also talks about the removal of the SD card and why Apple chose to keep the 3.5mm headphone jack.

New MacBook Pro 2016 release date, UK price and tech specs: Design

This is the first time a MacBook Pro will not include standard USB ports (that is to say, USB-A, the version we’re all used to), with both models featuring four USB-C ports which also serve as Thunderbolt 3 ports. This means the MacBook Air is now the only current-generation Apple laptop with standard USB ports. (Apple does still sell a few MacBook models from the previous generation, though, including the 2015 MacBook Pro models which feature the older USB ports: here’s the 2015 13-inch model, and here’s the 15-inch one.)

There is, thankfully, a headphone jack on the new MacBook Pro. The set-up is largely the same as on the current 12in MacBook, which has one USB-C and one headphone jack as its only ports – the Pro just gets a few more of those USB-C ports (either 2 or 4, depending on which model you go for). The new MacBook Pro no longer features MagSafe charging or an SD card slot.

 

Much like the 12in MacBook, the MacBook Pro now has butterfly mechanism keys, allowing for less travel and a thinner chassis. Apple says these second-generation butterfly keys improve on the typing experience from the 12in MacBook range.

The 13in model is 14.9mm thick, 17 percent thinner than the previous generation, and its volume is 23 percent less. It weighs 1.36kg.

The 15in model is 15.5mm thick and 20 percent less in volume than the last generation. It weighs only 1.81kg, which is very light for a 15in laptop. Apple has also added a larger Force Touch trackpad to this version.

The addition of the metal Apple logo on the casing means the iconic light-up Apple logo is no longer included on the MacBook Pro range. The 13in MacBook Air is now the last surviving MacBook to have a light-up logo, unless you count last year’s MacBook Pro.

 

 

 
[Source:- Macworld]

New MacBook 2016 release date, price, specs rumours UK: No 12-inch MacBook announced alongside new MacBook Pro 2016 – now expected March 2017

New MacBook

s a 13in MacBook going to launch in 2016? When will the 2017 12-inch MacBook be released? What can I expect from the next 12-inch MacBook in terms of tech specs? How much will the 2017 12-inch MacBook cost? Will the 12-inch MacBook replace the MacBook Air range?

Apple only released the 2016 variant of the 12in MacBook back in April 2016, but we’re already looking to the future and what we could expect from next year’s model, the 2017 12in MacBook. Here, we sift through the latest rumours surrounding the 2017 MacBook and also our personal predictions based on previous Apple events, and knowledge of the company.

Those of you that want to find out more about the current 12in MacBook released in April 2016 can take a look at our 12in MacBook review, which covers everything from pricing to performance and design, sprinkled with our personal opinions of Apple’s latest MacBook.

Apple decided not to update the MacBook or MacBook Air line during its October 2016 event, and decided to cut the 11in MacBook Air completely. This suggests that the MacBook is set to replace the Air line. We suspect a refresh to the MacBook line in March 2017.

Read more: Best MacBook buying guide | Best Mac buying guide 2017 | Best cheap MacBook deals UK

New MacBook 2016 release date rumours: When is the new 12in MacBook coming out?

So, when are we likely to see the next-generation 12in MacBook? Considering that Apple only recently released the 2016 variant of the laptop, we assumed we wouldn’t be seeing another upgrade until next year, 2017.

Apple has trademarked three new MacBook mode numbers, according to a Russian trademark filing. The three new model numbers, A1706, A1707 and A1708, were tipped to be a 13in and 15in MacBook Pro, and a MacBook with a 12in screen. This is all according to the reliable KGI analyst Ming-Chi Kuo – we aren’t sure if these model numbers correspond with the new MacBook Pro models – but we will update this article once we confirm the model numbers.

We had originally expected to see the 2016 variant of the MacBook announced during 2016’s spring Apple event, which was one year on from Apple’s unveiling of the very first 12-inch MacBook models. But instead, Apple revealed the iPhone SE, a 9.7in iPad Pro and new Apple Watch straps, with no mention of an updated MacBook. A few weeks later Apple surprised us by updating the MacBook without any bells and whistles or another event.

Apple is a company of habit – new iOS software is showcased every June (along with macOS, tvOS and watchOS) which is then released alongside the latest generation iPhone months later, in September. It has been that way for more than a few years now, with the only exception being with the launch of the iPhone 4. Following Apple’s MacBook habits to date, it suggests to us that we’ll be seeing the 2017 MacBook sat on our laps between March and May 2017.

New MacBook 2016 rumours: Will the 12in MacBook replace the MacBook Air?

In October 2016 Apple showcased four new MacBooks, none of them an Air model. It seems Apple wants us to believe that it hasn’t officially killed off the Air, but it all looks like an indirect confirmation of the 12-inch MacBook replacing the Air in Apple’s affection and ongoing product portfolio.

Apple’s MacBook Air design is now eight years old, and it’s quite possible that the MacBook is lining up to replace it in the near future. When the MacBook Air first launched, its biggest selling point was its thin and light design, hence the name; but the MacBook now outshines it in those areas. To be honest, barring a major and revolutionary redesign it seems unlikely that the MacBook Air has much of a future ahead of it. Plus, for those looking for ultimate portability there’s the new iPad Pro with a 12.9in screen.

Content continues below

The last time there was a Mac laptop that had more advanced specs than a more expensive model was the old MacBooks (white and black, and then eventually aluminium). Those were eventually discontinued and the price of the MacBook Air reduced. It seems likely that the same will happen with the new MacBook models replacing the MacBook Air models at a lower price than they are now, at least eventually – especially considering the MacBook Air’s less-than-exciting 2016 update.

According to trusted Apple analyst Ming-Chi Kuo, the 12in MacBook is now Apple’s best-selling computer, closely followed by the 13in MacBook Pro, which adds further fuel to the rumour that it’ll soon replace the MacBook Air thanks to its popularity.

KGI Securities analyst Ming-Chi Kuo also claims that Apple is planning to introduce a 13in MacBook to sit alongside the 12in model in the third quarter of 2016. Kuo is a goldmine for inside Apple information and has been called “the most accurate Apple analyst in the world”, providing accurate rumours regarding the iPhone 6s months in advance of its release, along with a flurry of predictions about the upcoming iPhone 7which many assume to be true. Current rumours suggest an October hardware event where Apple will announce the 2016 MacBook Pro – will the company announce a larger MacBook alongside it?

However, while Kuo is usually accurate, we’re not too confident about this one. The rumour hasn’t been backed up by any leaks or other sources, and it seems like a pretty strange move to release a new MacBook only 1in larger than the current model, so it’s best to take this with a pinch of salt. If true, we think it signals the end of the MacBook Air range. See more MacBook Air rumours here.

New MacBook 2016 release date rumours UK: UK price

While we’re still a way away from the official announcement of the 2017 MacBook, we can already speculate about the pricing as Apple rarely changes the price of its range from generation to generation, unless it’s a fairly hefty upgrade.

With that being said, the 2016 MacBook Pro will set you back £1,449 for the basic variant and £1,949 for a more powerful variant – and the prices have all gone up since Brexit too (Basic Air is £100 more, and basic MacBook is £200 more expensive!)

New MacBook 2016 release date rumours UK: Design and features

Looking at the change in design from the 2015 MacBook to the 2016 MacBook, it suggests that we won’t be seeing huge physical changes. In fact, the only change in design from the original MacBook and the 2016 MacBook was the addition of a new colour option, Rose Gold, to go alongside the readily available Gold, Silver and Space Grey options.

Aside from that, the design hasn’t changed for the MacBook. It’s incredibly thin at 13.1mm, and it weighs just 0.9kg, making it 24 percent thinner than the MacBook Air, and we don’t expect that to change dramatically in future.

Will the 2016 MacBook have a Force Touch keyboard?

Update 14 October: According to 9to5Mac, Apple is in talks with the Foxconn startup, Sonder – a company that uses E Ink technology to display its keys (see a video here). This allows a way of customising keys and even adding symbols which would not be possible on a regular keyboard. It’s rumoured that Apple will use this technology in their next MacBook.

Back in autumn 2015, it emerged that Apple had filed a patent that appeared to show its design for a Force Touch capable keyboard. Along with the 2015 MacBook Pro, the 2015 MacBook has a Force Touch trackpad, which gave electric pulses that feel like clicks, but is a glass plate that doesn’t actually move. Like on the iPhone 6s, you can press harder for a deeper click to access menus and options within certain apps. The new MacBook also has keys unlike any other Mac, which have very little travel in order to make the chassis ultra-thin.

The newly discovered patent shows what seems to be a whole keyboard and trackpad area fit to house this technology.

As this shows, the whole keyboard and trackpad, plus areas to the left and right of the pad, could theoretically be customised to the user’s tastes and, for the first time, not have a physical keyboard. However, we have seen Apple file patents in the past that are to bookmark ideas for the future.

It’d be amazing if this technology were included in the new MacBook next year, but we feel this is one for the coming years. It would potentially allow you to have several language keyboards saved and switch between them on the adaptable display. We can but dream.

Imagine typing on a surface that felt like a keyboard, but was actually electric feedback telling your brain you’re pressing keys? If this is Force Touch’s future, we are excited.

Will the MacBook feature an Apple Pencil-compatible trackpad?

It’s not the only new addition to the MacBook either, if the latest patent approval is anything to go by. According to a patent filed by Apple which was recently approved, an upcoming Mac could boast compatibility with the Apple Pencil – although the Apple Pencil depicted in the patent is far more advanced than the one on sale at the moment. The Pencil in question features a number of sensors that could detect movement, orientation and depth and, according to the patent, could be used with a Mac as an ‘air mouse’ or possibly even a joystick for gaming.

The patent reads: “Inertial sensor input may be gathered when operating the stylus in one or more inertial sensor input modes such as an air mouse mode, a rotational controller mode, a joystick mode, and/or other inertial sensor input modes.

It doesn’t end there, either – apparently an upcoming Mac trackpad will feature Apple Pencil support, allowing users to use and draw directly onto the trackpad with the precision of the iPad Pro. While the patent doesn’t mention whether the trackpad will be built into a MacBook or offered as a standalone Mac trackpad, we imagine that if Apple plans on utilising the patent, it’ll do so with its newest line of laptops – the MacBook.

Will Apple discontinue Thunderbolt?

One question that has arisen is whether the introduction of USB-C spells the end of Thunderbolt. We don’t think that Apple will drop Thunderbolt from its Pro Mac line up any time soon, but the standard may well disappear from the consumer level Macs eventually.

The reason we think it will remain on the MacBook Pro, Mac Pro and the iMac is Apple’s efforts to convince the industry to adopt it since its introduction in 2011. However, Apple also promoted FireWire to the industry and eventually removed that from its Macs.

New MacBook 2016 release date rumours UK: Tech specs

What can we expect to see from the 2017 MacBook in terms of design? While rumours are scarce at these early stages, there is one interesting rumour that, if true, could herald in a new generation of Force Touch-enabled keyboards for Apple’s laptop line.

Processors

The next-generation MacBook is likely to feature next-generation Intel processors, as well as graphics and RAM upgrades. Intel has started shipping its Kaby Lake processors: that’s the generation of chips after Skylake, and offers support for Thunderbolt 3, USB 3.1 and DisplayPort 1.2.

But there’s another, less predictable, possibility. The Dutch-language site Techtastichas spotted a reference in the kernel of macOS Sierra to “ARM HURRICANE” being supported.

This isn’t a chip family that anyone has heard of, but it’s probably an Apple custom ARM chip: the A7 (in the iPhone 5s) was codenamed Cyclone, the A8 Typhoon and the A9 Twister. Apple might be about to put ARM chips in its new MacBooks.

Will the 2016 MacBook have LTE connectivity?

It seems that sharing your iPhone’s cellular connection with your MacBook wasn’t enough for Apple, if the latest patent approval is anything to go by. The patent, as described by the US Patent and Trademark Office, will allow the company to embed LTE hardware in the 2017 MacBook, making it the first cellular-enabled Mac in Apple’s range, past or present.

 

 

[Source:- Macworld]

 

New FL Studio Mobile offering in the Windows Store for on the go music editing

Windows 10 Mobile has been a mixed bag of development when it comes to app support. While Windows 10 Mobile inherited the downward trend of failing app support, the newest iteration of Microsoft’s mobile operating system is leveraging the foundation of its more developer inviting bigger brother Windows 10, to varying degrees of success to entice mobile app support.

Some bigger name app developers have taken the bait and created Universal Windows Platform apps that span both PCs and Mobile devices and adding to the list of interested developers is FL Studio.

Formerly Fruity Loops, FL Studio has offered a modern PC version of its app in the Windows Store beginning with Windows 8 development. Admittedly, the new FL Studio app for Windows PCs has seen few updates and feature additions since its arrival in the Windows Store, but the developers newest project may circumvent the stagnation.

Thanks to a tip from WinBeta reader Amir, we now know FL Studio is offering a new app titled FL Studio Mobile in the Windows Store that is promising a better full-featured experience for Windows users.

According to the app features list:

Features

  • Fully functional music production Application. Record edit and sequence music.
  • For those of us still wielding Windows 10 Mobile powered phones, the addition of FL Studio Mobile could be a godsend, especially for the quick track edit, impromptu podcast, or cleaning up the occasionally recorded class lecture.

    A note to those interested, the app is listed at a surprising $14.99 for download with a tag about in-app purchases. While $14.99 for a quality app should not be surprising, the fact that the older Windows 8 PC version of the app remains free for download makes the listed price of FL Studio Mobile a bit of a head scratcher.

    It also appears there is a redeem code option for those who can find a code.

[Source:- Winbeta]