Complex 3-D data on all devices

Complex 3-D data on all devices

A new web-based software platform is swiftly bringing the visualization of 3-D data to every device, optimizing the use of, for example, virtual reality and augmented reality in industry. In this way, Fraunhofer researchers have brought the ideal of “any data on any device” a good deal closer.

If you want to be sure that the person you are sending documents and pictures to will be able to open them on their computer, then you send them in PDF and JPG format. But what do you do with 3-D content? “A standardized option hasn’t existed before now,” says Dr. Johannes Behr, head of the Visual Computing System Technologies department at the Fraunhofer Institute for Computer Graphics Research IGD. In particular, industry lacks a means of taking the very large, increasingly complex volumes of 3-D data that arise and rendering them useful – and of being able to use the data on every device, from smartphones to VR goggles. “The data volume is growing faster than the means of visualizing it,” reports Behr. Fraunhofer IGD is presenting a solution to this problem in the form of its “instant3DHub” software, which allows engineers, technicians and assemblers to use spatial design and assembly plans without any difficulty on their own devices. “This will enable them to inspect industrial plants or digital buildings, etc. in real time and find out what’s going on there,” explains Behr.

Software calculates only visible components

On account of the gigantic volumes of data that have to be processed, such an undertaking has thus far been either impossible or possible only with a tremendous amount of effort. After all, users had to manually choose in advance which data should be processed for the visualization, a task then executed by expensive special software. Not exactly a cost-effective method, and a time-consuming one as well. With the web-based Fraunhofer solution, every company can adapt the visualization tool to its requirements. The software autonomously selects the data to be prepared, by intelligently calculating, for example, that only views of visible parts are transmitted to the user’s device. Citing the example of a power plant, Behr explains: “Out of some 3.5 million components, only the approximately 3,000 visible parts are calculated on the server and transmitted to the device.”

Such visibility calculations are especially useful for VR and AR applications, as the objects being viewed at any given moment appear in the display in real time. At CeBIT, researchers will be showing how well this works, using the example of car maintenance. In a VR application, it is necessary to load up to 120 images per second onto data goggles. In this way, several thousand points of 3-D data can be transmitted from a central database for a vehicle model to a device in just one second. The process is so fast because the complete data does not have to be loaded to the device, as used to be the case, but is streamed over the web. A huge variety of 3-D web applications are delivered on the fly, without permanent storage, so that even mobile devices such as tablets and smartphones can make optimal use of them. One key feature of this process is that for every access to instant3DHub, the data is assigned to, prepared and visualized for the specific applications. “As a result, the system fulfills user- and device-specific requirements, and above all is secure,” says Behr. BMW, Daimler and Porsche already use instant3DHub at over 1,000 workstations. Even medium-sized companies such as SimScale and thinkproject have successfully implemented “instantreality” and instant3Dhub and are developing their own individual software solutions on that basis.

Augmented reality is a key technology for Industrie 4.0

Technologies that create a link between CAD data and the real production environment are also relevant for the domain of augmented reality. “Augmented reality is a key technology for Industrie 4.0, because it constantly compares the digital target situation in real time against the actual situation as captured by cameras and sensors,” adds Dr. Ulrich Bockholt, head of the Virtual and Augmented Reality department at Fraunhofer IGD. Ultimately, however, the solution is of interest to many sectors, he explains, even in the construction and architecture field, where it can be used to help visualize building information models on smartphones, tablet computers or data goggles.

 

[Source:- Phys.org]

 

 

Upcoming Windows 10 update reduces spying, but Microsoft is still mum on which data it specifically collects

Privacy-2-1024x812

There’s some good news for privacy-minded individuals who haven’t been fond of Microsoft’s data collection policy with Windows 10. When the upcoming Creators Update drops this spring, it will overhaul Microsoft’s data collection policies. Terry Myerson, executive vice president of Microsoft’s Windows and Devices Group, has published a blog post with a list of the changes Microsoft will be making.

First, Microsoft has launched a new web-based privacy dashboard with the goal of giving people an easy, one-stop location for controlling how much data Microsoft collects. Your privacy dashboard has sections for Browse, Search, Location, and Cortana’s Notebook, each covering a different category of data MS might have received from your hardware. Personally, I keep the Digital Assistant side of Cortana permanently deactivated and already set telemetry to minimal, but if you haven’t taken those steps you can adjust how much data Microsoft keeps from this page.

Second, Microsoft is condensing its telemetry options. Currently, there are four options — Security, Basic, Enhanced, and Full. Most consumers only have access to three of these settings — Basic, Enhanced, and Full. The fourth, security, is reserved for Windows 10 Enterprise or Windows 10 Education. Here’s how Microsoft describes each category:

Security: Information that’s required to help keep Windows, Windows Server, and System Center secure, including data about the Connected User Experience and Telemetry component settings, the Malicious Software Removal Tool, and Windows Defender.

Basic: Basic device info, including: quality-related data, app compatibility, app usage data, and data from the Security level.

Enhanced: Additional insights, including: how Windows, Windows Server, System Center, and apps are used, how they perform, advanced reliability data, and data from both the Basic and the Security levels.

Full: All data necessary to identify and help to fix problems, plus data from the Security, Basic, and Enhanced levels.

That’s the old system. Going forward, Microsoft is collapsing the number of telemetry levels to two. Here’s how Myerson describes the new “Basic” level:

[We’ve] further reduced the data collected at the Basic level. This includes data that is vital to the operation of Windows. We use this data to help keep Windows and apps secure, up-to-date, and running properly when you let Microsoft know the capabilities of your device, what is installed, and whether Windows is operating correctly. This option also includes basic error reporting back to Microsoft.

Windows 10 will also include an enhanced privacy section that will show during start-up and offer much better granularity over privacy settings. Currently, many of these controls are buried in various menus that you have to manually configure after installing the operating system.

It’s nice that Microsoft is cutting back on telemetry collection at the basic level. The problem is, as Stephen J Vaughn-Nichols writes, Microsoft is still collecting a creepy amount of information on “Full,” and it still defaults to sharing all this information with Cortana — which means Microsoft has data files on people it can be compelled to turn over by a warrant from an organization like the NSA or FBI. Given the recent expansion of the NSA’s powers, this information can now be shared with a variety of other agencies without filtering it first. And while Microsoft’s business model doesn’t directly depend on scraping and selling customer data the way Google does, the company is still gathering an unspecified amount of information. Full telemetry, for example, may “unintentionally include parts of a document you were using when a problem occurred.” Vaughn-Nichols isn’t thrilled about that idea, and neither am I.

The problem with Microsoft’s disclosure is it mostly doesn’t disclose. Even basic telemetry is described as “includes data that is vital to the operation of Windows.” Okay. But what does that mean?

I’m glad to see Microsoft taking steps towards restoring user privacy, but these are small steps that only modify policies around the edges. Until the company actually and meaningfully discloses what telemetry is collected under Basic settings and precisely what Full settings do and don’t send in the way of personally identifying information, the company isn’t explaining anything so much as it’s using vague terms and PR in place of a disclosure policy.

As I noted above, I’d recommend turning Cortana (the assistant) off. If you don’t want to do that, you should regularly review the information MS has collected about you and delete any items you don’t want to part of the company’s permanent record.

 

 

[Source:- Extremetech]

What’s on your Start Screen, Zac Bowden?

Image result for What's on your Start Screen, Zac Bowden?

It’s been a little while since we last did a “What’s on your Start Screen?”, and that’s because so much has been changing within the world of Windows phone over the last couple of years. With the introduction of Windows 10 Mobile, the redesign of several Windows phone apps, and the slow transition from several different versions of Windows to one single Windows that works across every device, we just haven’t found the time!

A lot of Windows Phone users have since left the platform since our last Start Screen article, and that’s unfortunate. However, there’s still a few of us left using Windows phones as our daily drivers, and I thought it’d be a good idea to share some of the apps I’m using on the lead up to 2017.

I don’t have many apps pinned, and that’s simply because I don’t like scrolling on my Start Screen. I’m a huge user of live tiles, and I think live tiles should be on screen at all times so I can see what information they have to offer. Still, I try to make good use of my screen real estate.

My Apps

  • Messaging: I’m super big on SMS. I know that’s kind of odd leading into 2017, but I much prefer it over any form of instant messenger such as WhatsApp or Skype. If I can, I’ll always opt to send an SMS if trying to contact someone. Everybody has SMS.
  • Phone: The standard built-in Phone app. I don’t make calls all that often, but I feel like I need to have this app pinned on my Start Screen just in case I am in a situation in which I do need to make a call.
  • Outlook Calendar: I like being able to see the date and upcoming appointments on my Start Screen, and the Calendar app does just that. Rarely do I open the Calendar app, this is definitely one of those situations in which the live tile does everything I need it to do.
  • Microsoft Edge: Edge is the best way to browse the web on a Windows 10 Mobile device, so I’m constantly using it to view websites, read news, watch videos and more. It syncs favorites across Windows 10 devices, and is lightweight and easy to use.
  • Windows Store: The Windows Store is home to all purchasable Content in the Windows ecosystem. Whether it be apps, games, music or movies/TV, I’m always in the Store looking for something new to spend my money on. I often find a movie, or a game that catches my interest.
  • Twitter: When it comes to Twitter, I opt for the official Twitter app from Twitter themselves. Yes, I know there are far better Twitter clients out there built by third parties, but I like the simplicity of the official app. It’s universal and works across PC and Phone, and what’s more, even though there are a plethora of bugs and missing features, it gets the job done.
  • Cortana: I don’t actually use Cortana all that much, but I have it pinned just in case I want to mess with a setting or two with syncing notifications and whatnot. I like the news ticker that pops up on the live tile, and will sometimes open it up to check on reminders and adjust things.
  • Outlook Mail: The built-in Mail app is my choice of email client on Windows 10 Mobile. It does everything I need, from a reliable live tile all the way down to the simplicity of the app. I can add my Outlook, Google, Yahoo and other email accounts with ease, and configure notification popups from specific accounts if needed.
  • GroupMe: GroupMe is one of the best group messaging apps available on Windows 10 Mobile, and I use it frequently with some of the Windows Central team. It’s great for team collaboration, goofing around, and just sharing things for later.
  • WhatsApp Beta: Although I’m big on SMS, I do have a need for WhatsApp too. A lot of my personal friends would rather be contacted through WhatsApp, so that’s what I use when contacting them. The WhatsApp Beta app, although still a Windows Phone 8.1 app, is coming along quite nicely being updated constantly with new features and changes.
  • Slack: Slack is the main communication platform we use here at Mobile Nations. It’s how I message the team, and how the team message me. It’s still in beta, but the app is feature-filled enough to be usable as one of my “must-have” apps on my phone.
  • Groove Music: Groove is the best music streaming service available on Windows 10 Mobile. Sure, there’s Pandora and Spotify, but those apps aren’t all that great compared to Groove, which is arguable the best app available on Windows 10 right now. I’m a subscriber to Groove music, and most of the music I’d want to listen to is ready to stream from the service.
  • Windows Central: Of course, how could I not have this one pinned to my Start Screen? I love the Windows Central app, it’s easy to use and is always updated with the latest articles direct from our feed. The live tile is super customizable too!
  • Weather: I live in the United Kingdom, so I need to know whether the weather outside is grey and raining. It usually is, but sometimes that live tile shows a bit of sunshine, and that makes me smile.
  • Instagram: Not a huge user of Instagram, I generally only use it when procrastinating. Maybe one day I’ll be Instagram-famous.
  • Trello Central: We use Trello for article planning and scheduling here at Mobile Nations, so it makes sense for me to have an app on my phone that allows me to jump in there and check on things. It’s not super feature-filled, being a 3rd-party app, but it gets the job done.
  • Uber: As a kid, I always wanted own my own car so I could drive wherever I needed, whenever I needed to. In 2016 however, all I need is Uber. Who needs to drive these days when you can get someone else to drive for you?!

 

[Source:- Windowscentral]

The SIM-unlocked Alcatel IDOL 4S quietly goes on sale through the Microsoft Store

Image result for The SIM-unlocked Alcatel IDOL 4S quietly goes on sale through the Microsoft Store

Looks like speculation that Alcatel’s Idol 4S running Windows 10 Mobile going carrier-unlocked (GSM) after a T-Mobile exclusivity ended were true. As spotted on MSPU Microsoft has begun to make the rather powerful – and impressive – Windows 10 Mobile phone available for purchase in the US through their store.

Asking price is still the same $470, which includes the VR goggle package and 21MP rear camera.

Alcatel Idol 4S with Windows 10 Specs

CPU Snapdragon 820 | Quad Core CPU @2.15 GHz
Display 5.5-inch FHD AMOLED
Dragontrail 2.5D Glass
Memory 64GB ROM
4GB RAM
microSD
Camera 21 MP rear camera
8 MP front-facing camera
Battery 3,000 mAh
Quick Charge 3.0
420Hrs Standby
15Hrs Talk
Continuum Yes
VR Yes
Windows Hello Yes (Fingerprint)
Audio Dual speakers with Hi-Fi surround sound
Dimensions 153.9 x 75.4 x 6.99 mm
Weight 152g
HD Voice Yes
VoLTE Yes
Wi-Fi 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac
Wi-Fi Calling 1.0
Bluetooth BT 4.1
A2DP, OPP, HFP, AVRCP, PBAP

The rest of the specifications and color (‘Halo Gold’) are all the same as well. In fact, it’s likely the same device as our review unit, which was unlocked as well and worked brilliantly on AT&T with no issue.

Microsoft notes that the unlocked version should work on AT&T, T-Mobile, H20, Straight Talk, Cricket Wireless, MetroPCS, and select prepaid carriers.

 

[Source:- Windowscentral]

 

Google Assistant supports continuous conversations on Android TV

Google Assistant, which launched with the Pixel phones back in October and is soon coming to Android TV, is quite a useful feature. By using it, you can control certain functions of your device with your voice and save a bit of time in the process.

But Google’s Assistant is not without faults. Although it can continue a conversation based on context, you still have to activate it by saying “OK Google” before you ask a question, which can get annoying after a while and just makes the experience unnatural.

It looks like Google is aware of this issue and is making a few changes that will improve how Assistant works. Well, at least on Android TV. According to a video posted online by Android Police, Google’s Assistant on Android TV supports continuous conversation mode. What this means is that after you get a response to your question, Assistant will keep listening for a little while just in case you want to ask it something else. If you want to continue the conversation, you can ask whatever you’re interested in without activating the voice assistant first by saying “OK Google”.

The feature really does make a difference if you’re using Assistant on a daily basis. That’s why we would love to see it on other Assistant enabled devices including the Pixel and Pixel XL smartphones and Google Home.  Unfortunately, Google hasn’t commented regarding this topic yet so, for now, all we can do is wait and hope that the online search giant will eventually bring the feature to other tech gadgets.

 

 

 

[Source:- Androidauthority]

MrMobile on the Sennheiser PXC 550: Better than Bose?

Image result for MrMobile,on,the,Sennheiser,PXC,550:,Better,than,Bose?

The Sennheiser PXC 550 can keep your ears closed off to the rest of the world. A must-have for those of you with long holiday travels and long holidays with family. They’re good-looking and long-lasting, just like everything you’d want in a … pair of noise-reducing headphones. With the added luxury of a touch-sensitive panel to help control what you’re listening to, you’ll really drive your … headphones wild.

MrMobile, in his infinite wisdom, will help you decide if these cans are what your ears have been looking (listening?) for, or if you’re better off with the Bose QC35. Take Michael Fisher’s advice, and you’ll be ready for all that December has to offer.

 

 

[Source:- Windowscentral]

An easier way to set up SQL Server on an Azure virtual machine

Image result for An easier way to set up SQL Server on an Azure virtual machine

setup procedure will allow users to configure SQL Server on Microsoft Azure without the aid of a database administrator.

“The new wizard for building and configuring a new virtual machine with SQL Server 2014 is very well put together,” said Denny Cherry, founder and principal consultant for Denny Cherry and Associates Consulting. “It helps solve a lot of the complexity of building a new SQL Server, specifically around how you need to configure the storage in order to get a high-performing SQL Server VM.”

Joseph D’Antoni, principal consultant at Denny Cherry and Associates Consulting, said that one of the major challenges with Azure was allocating storage. For instance, he said, to configure SQL Server on an Azure VM, you needed to allocate disks manually to get the needed amount of IOPS. This meant you had to know exactly what your storage application needs were for optimal performance, and many people were “kind of guessing,” D’Antoni said. With the new wizard, all you have to do is enter the required number of IOPS and storage is allocated automatically.

Automating SQL Server setup for an Azure VM means that no longer does everything have to be done manually: Connectivity, performance, security and storage are configured automatically during setup. “I think it does simplify what was a pretty complex process,” D’Antoni said.

You can now use the Internet to set up SQL Server connectivity and enable SQL Server authentication through the Azure Web portal. Previously, connecting SQL Server to an Azure VM via the Internet required a multistep process using SQL Server Management Studio. The new automated configuration process lets you pick whether to expand connectivity to the whole Azure virtual network or to connect only within the individual VM.

The new process for configuring SQL Server on an Azure virtual machine also includes automated patching and automated backup. The automated patching allows you pick a time when you want all your patches to occur. Users can schedule patches to minimize the impact they’ll have on the workload.  Automated backup allows you to specify how long to keep backups.

“I think that these are a great enhancement on the old process of having to know how to configure these components manually within the VM,” Cherry said, “because these configurations can get tricky to configure.”

D’Antoni added that this innovation is going to affect smaller organizations the most, because it means that they won’t need an expert to move SQL Server onto an Azure virtual machine. “[The simplified configuration] gives the power to someone who is deploying a VM when they would have needed an administrator or a DBA before. To that extent, it’s kind of a big deal.”

 
[Source:- searchsqlserver]

 

New FL Studio Mobile offering in the Windows Store for on the go music editing

Windows 10 Mobile has been a mixed bag of development when it comes to app support. While Windows 10 Mobile inherited the downward trend of failing app support, the newest iteration of Microsoft’s mobile operating system is leveraging the foundation of its more developer inviting bigger brother Windows 10, to varying degrees of success to entice mobile app support.

Some bigger name app developers have taken the bait and created Universal Windows Platform apps that span both PCs and Mobile devices and adding to the list of interested developers is FL Studio.

Formerly Fruity Loops, FL Studio has offered a modern PC version of its app in the Windows Store beginning with Windows 8 development. Admittedly, the new FL Studio app for Windows PCs has seen few updates and feature additions since its arrival in the Windows Store, but the developers newest project may circumvent the stagnation.

Thanks to a tip from WinBeta reader Amir, we now know FL Studio is offering a new app titled FL Studio Mobile in the Windows Store that is promising a better full-featured experience for Windows users.

According to the app features list:

Features

  • Fully functional music production Application. Record edit and sequence music.
  • For those of us still wielding Windows 10 Mobile powered phones, the addition of FL Studio Mobile could be a godsend, especially for the quick track edit, impromptu podcast, or cleaning up the occasionally recorded class lecture.

    A note to those interested, the app is listed at a surprising $14.99 for download with a tag about in-app purchases. While $14.99 for a quality app should not be surprising, the fact that the older Windows 8 PC version of the app remains free for download makes the listed price of FL Studio Mobile a bit of a head scratcher.

    It also appears there is a redeem code option for those who can find a code.

[Source:- Winbeta]

Recognizing the top Database Systems contributors on MSDN forums!

MSDN Contributors Leaderboard

We are planning to launch a monthly leaderboard for the top contributors on MSDN forums. This is a pilot effort for Database Systems, including SQL Server, Azure SQL Database, Azure SQL Data Warehouse, and SQL Server VMs on Azure questions on MSDN. Read more about it on the Azure blog and send in your feedback to [email protected]

Congratulations to our October 2016 Top 10 contributors!

 

 

[Source:- Technet]

Here are a few easy steps to setup UPI apps on your phone

There’s no denying that demonetization has affected the public in a significant way. Thankfully, the government has provided various options for the customers to continue banking as usual with the help of easy-to-use mobile wallets as well as the newly launched UPI services. UPI stands for Unified Payments Interface, and a number of financial institutions have aligned with the project.

What can you do with UPI apps?
Well, you can send snappy payments via IMPS and even request for payments from your contacts, provided they are also using a UPI app on their smartphone. This is pretty much like a mobile wallet, but something that is inked directly with the bank.

One advantage with UPI apps is that even if you download an app from another bank, you will still be able to enter account details from your source bank without much fuss.

How to get started?
The apps are Android only for the time being, but an iPhone app is apparently on its way. Once you get the app of your choice (Yes Bank, ICICI Bank etc) on the Play Store, you will simply have to enter your mobile number that you have registered with the bank. This step will also ask you to create a new 4-digit PIN number, which is basically a password and will have to be used when users log in each time.

Following this process, you will have to create a new and unique VPA or virtual payment address. This will be used by others to send you money or identity your account. The VPA can be anything ranging from your name to the phone number.

With the VPA process out of the way, it’s now time to connect to your bank so that all your details are made visible. The transaction limit on UPI is capped at Rs 1,00,000, with the minimum being Rs 50.

To receive money from someone, you merely have to pick out the VPA name/address from your list and then request or schedule a payment. Bear in mind that you can only receive money when the user on the other end also has a UPI app.

 

 

[Source:- Techradre]